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Article: Possible Role of Songbirds and Parakeets in Transmission of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus to Humans

TitlePossible Role of Songbirds and Parakeets in Transmission of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus to Humans
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm
Citation
Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 20 n. 3, p. 380-385 How to Cite?
AbstractAvian-origin influenza A(H7N9) recently emerged in China, causing severe human disease. Several subtype H7N9 isolates contain influenza genes previously identified in viruses from finch-like birds. Because wild and domestic songbirds interact with humans and poultry, we investigated the susceptibility and transmissibility of subtype H7N9 in these species. Finches, sparrows, and parakeets supported replication of a human subtype H7N9 isolate, shed high titers through the oropharyngeal route, and showed few disease signs. Virus was shed into water troughs, and several contact animals seroconverted, although they shed little virus. Our study demonstrates that a human isolate can replicate in and be shed by such songbirds and parakeets into their environment. This finding has implications for these birds' potential as intermediate hosts with the ability to facilitate transmission and dissemination of A(H7N9) virus.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202034
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 6.259
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.023
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJones, JC-
dc.contributor.authorSonnberg, S-
dc.contributor.authorKoçer, ZA-
dc.contributor.authorShanmuganatham, K-
dc.contributor.authorSeiler, P-
dc.contributor.authorShu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, M-
dc.contributor.authorWebby, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RG-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:59:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:59:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 20 n. 3, p. 380-385-
dc.identifier.issn1080-6040-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202034-
dc.description.abstractAvian-origin influenza A(H7N9) recently emerged in China, causing severe human disease. Several subtype H7N9 isolates contain influenza genes previously identified in viruses from finch-like birds. Because wild and domestic songbirds interact with humans and poultry, we investigated the susceptibility and transmissibility of subtype H7N9 in these species. Finches, sparrows, and parakeets supported replication of a human subtype H7N9 isolate, shed high titers through the oropharyngeal route, and showed few disease signs. Virus was shed into water troughs, and several contact animals seroconverted, although they shed little virus. Our study demonstrates that a human isolate can replicate in and be shed by such songbirds and parakeets into their environment. This finding has implications for these birds' potential as intermediate hosts with the ability to facilitate transmission and dissemination of A(H7N9) virus.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titlePossible Role of Songbirds and Parakeets in Transmission of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus to Humans-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhu, H: zhuhch@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, H=rp01535-
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid2003.131271-
dc.identifier.pmid24572739-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3944875-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84894278814-
dc.identifier.hkuros232585-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage380-
dc.identifier.epage385-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000332433900006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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