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Article: Insights into the hallmarks of human nucleus pulposus cells with particular reference to cell viability, phagocytic potential and long process formation

TitleInsights into the hallmarks of human nucleus pulposus cells with particular reference to cell viability, phagocytic potential and long process formation
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherIvyspring International Publisher. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medsci.org/
Citation
International Journal of Medical Sciences, 2013, v. 10 n. 13, p. 1805-1816 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: As a main cellular component within the disc, nucleus pulposus (NP) cells play important roles in disc physiology. However, little is known on the biologic hallmarks of human NP cells. Therefore, the present study aimed to address the features of human NP cells. METHODS: Human NP samples were collected from normal cadavers, patients with scoliosis and disc degeneration as normal, disease control and degenerative NP, respectively. The NP samples were studied using transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay. Pre-digested NP samples were studied using flow cytometry with PI/Annexin V staining. RESULTS: Both control and degenerative human NP consisted of mainly viable cells with a variety of morphology. Both necrosis and apoptosis were noted in human NP as forms of cell death with increased apoptosis in degenerative NP, which was further confirmed by the TUNEL assay. Phagocytic NP cells had the hallmarks of both stationary macrophages with lysosomes and NP cells with the endoplasmic reticulum. Annulus fibrosus cells have similar morphologic characteristics with NP cells in terms of cell nest, phagocytosis and intracellular organs. Moreover, NP cells with long processes existed in degenerative and scoliotic NP rather than normal NP. When cultured in glucose-free medium, NP cells developed long and thin processes. CONCLUSION: Human degenerative NP consists of primarily viable cells. We present direct and in vivo evidence that both human annulus fibrosus and NP cells have phagocytic potential. Moreover, NP cells with long processes exist in both scoliotic and degenerative NP with lack of glucose as one of the possible underlying mechanisms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203240
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.813
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, YF-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, YZ-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WL-
dc.contributor.authorLuan, GN-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, ZH-
dc.contributor.authorGao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWan, ZY-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Z-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, S-
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.contributor.authorWang, CM-
dc.contributor.authorWang, HQ-
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZJ-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T13:11:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T13:11:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Medical Sciences, 2013, v. 10 n. 13, p. 1805-1816-
dc.identifier.issn1449-1907-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203240-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: As a main cellular component within the disc, nucleus pulposus (NP) cells play important roles in disc physiology. However, little is known on the biologic hallmarks of human NP cells. Therefore, the present study aimed to address the features of human NP cells. METHODS: Human NP samples were collected from normal cadavers, patients with scoliosis and disc degeneration as normal, disease control and degenerative NP, respectively. The NP samples were studied using transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay. Pre-digested NP samples were studied using flow cytometry with PI/Annexin V staining. RESULTS: Both control and degenerative human NP consisted of mainly viable cells with a variety of morphology. Both necrosis and apoptosis were noted in human NP as forms of cell death with increased apoptosis in degenerative NP, which was further confirmed by the TUNEL assay. Phagocytic NP cells had the hallmarks of both stationary macrophages with lysosomes and NP cells with the endoplasmic reticulum. Annulus fibrosus cells have similar morphologic characteristics with NP cells in terms of cell nest, phagocytosis and intracellular organs. Moreover, NP cells with long processes existed in degenerative and scoliotic NP rather than normal NP. When cultured in glucose-free medium, NP cells developed long and thin processes. CONCLUSION: Human degenerative NP consists of primarily viable cells. We present direct and in vivo evidence that both human annulus fibrosus and NP cells have phagocytic potential. Moreover, NP cells with long processes exist in both scoliotic and degenerative NP with lack of glucose as one of the possible underlying mechanisms.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIvyspring International Publisher. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medsci.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Medical Sciences-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Medical Sciences. Copyright © Ivyspring International Publisher.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.meshIntervertebral Disc - immunology - pathology-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Transmission-
dc.subject.meshPhagocytosis-
dc.titleInsights into the hallmarks of human nucleus pulposus cells with particular reference to cell viability, phagocytic potential and long process formation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.7150/ijms.6530-
dc.identifier.pmid24324357-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3856371-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84887636384-
dc.identifier.hkuros237995-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue13-
dc.identifier.spage1805-
dc.identifier.epage1816-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000328163400001-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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