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Article: Impacts of human activities on distribution of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and antibiotic resistance genes in marine coastal sediments of Hong Kong

TitleImpacts of human activities on distribution of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and antibiotic resistance genes in marine coastal sediments of Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsEnvironmental behavior
Metagenome
Microbial community
Pollution
Issue Date2016
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496
Citation
FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2016, v. 92 n. 9, article no. fiw128 How to Cite?
AbstractSulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sediments could be biomarkers for evaluating the environmental impacts of human activities, although factors governing their distribution are not clear yet. By using metagenomic approach, this study investigated the distributions of SRPs and ARGs in marine sediments collected from 12 different coastal locations of Hong Kong, which exhibited different pollution levels and were classified into two groups based on sediment parameters. Our results showed that relative abundances of major SRP genera to total prokaryotes were consistently lower in the more seriously polluted sediments (P-value < 0.05 in 13 of 20 genera), indicating that the relative abundance of SRPs is a negatively correlated biomarker for evaluating human impacts. Moreover, a unimodel distribution pattern for SRPs along with the pollution gradient was observed. Although total ARGs were enriched in sediments from the polluted sites, distribution of single major ARG types could be explained neither by individual sediment parameters nor by corresponding concentration of antibiotics. It supports the hypothesis that the persistence of ARGs in sediments may not need the selection of antibiotics. In summary, our study provided important hints of the niche differentiation of SRPs and behavior of ARGs in marine coastal sediment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234553
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.675
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.687
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, F-
dc.contributor.authorLi, B-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Y-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, JW-
dc.contributor.authorLi, X-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMY-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-14T13:47:37Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-14T13:47:37Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationFEMS Microbiology Ecology, 2016, v. 92 n. 9, article no. fiw128-
dc.identifier.issn0168-6496-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/234553-
dc.description.abstractSulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sediments could be biomarkers for evaluating the environmental impacts of human activities, although factors governing their distribution are not clear yet. By using metagenomic approach, this study investigated the distributions of SRPs and ARGs in marine sediments collected from 12 different coastal locations of Hong Kong, which exhibited different pollution levels and were classified into two groups based on sediment parameters. Our results showed that relative abundances of major SRP genera to total prokaryotes were consistently lower in the more seriously polluted sediments (P-value < 0.05 in 13 of 20 genera), indicating that the relative abundance of SRPs is a negatively correlated biomarker for evaluating human impacts. Moreover, a unimodel distribution pattern for SRPs along with the pollution gradient was observed. Although total ARGs were enriched in sediments from the polluted sites, distribution of single major ARG types could be explained neither by individual sediment parameters nor by corresponding concentration of antibiotics. It supports the hypothesis that the persistence of ARGs in sediments may not need the selection of antibiotics. In summary, our study provided important hints of the niche differentiation of SRPs and behavior of ARGs in marine coastal sediment.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496-
dc.relation.ispartofFEMS Microbiology Ecology-
dc.subjectEnvironmental behavior-
dc.subjectMetagenome-
dc.subjectMicrobial community-
dc.subjectPollution-
dc.titleImpacts of human activities on distribution of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and antibiotic resistance genes in marine coastal sediments of Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailDeng, Y: dengyu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T: zhangt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/femsec/fiw128-
dc.identifier.pmid27297722-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84985006643-
dc.identifier.hkuros270082-
dc.identifier.volume92-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. fiw128-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. fiw128-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000383898400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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