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Book Chapter: The influence of built environment on walking behavior: Measurement issues, theoretical considerations, modeling methodologies and chinese empirical studies

TitleThe influence of built environment on walking behavior: Measurement issues, theoretical considerations, modeling methodologies and chinese empirical studies
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Space-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and China, 2015, p. 53-75 How to Cite?
Abstract© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015. The built environment provides spatial, temporal and social contexts for human behavior. They usually comprise the following elements: (1) land use patterns, including the spatial distributions of buildings and human activities; (2) transportation systems, including hard transport infrastructure and soft transit service and (3) design, including the arrangement and appearance of physical elements (Handy 2005; Saelens and Handy 2008). Certain studies of the built environment on walking behavior in Western cities are driven by planning reform movements, such as new urbanism, smart growth and transit-oriented development (TOD). By shapin the built environment, planners aim to encourage walking behavior while reducing motorized movement. A built environment is labeled as “pedestrian-oriented” if it has relatively high density, a mixture of land uses, a street network with high connectivity, human-scale streets and desirable aesthetic qualities (Cervero and Kockelman 1997). Because walking is emerging as an important form of moderateintensity physical activity and a practical health improvementmethod for the general public, public health is putting great effort into researching walking behavior (Owen et al. 2004).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242655

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Hui-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Guibo-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Rongrong-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T10:51:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-10T10:51:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationSpace-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and China, 2015, p. 53-75-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242655-
dc.description.abstract© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015. The built environment provides spatial, temporal and social contexts for human behavior. They usually comprise the following elements: (1) land use patterns, including the spatial distributions of buildings and human activities; (2) transportation systems, including hard transport infrastructure and soft transit service and (3) design, including the arrangement and appearance of physical elements (Handy 2005; Saelens and Handy 2008). Certain studies of the built environment on walking behavior in Western cities are driven by planning reform movements, such as new urbanism, smart growth and transit-oriented development (TOD). By shapin the built environment, planners aim to encourage walking behavior while reducing motorized movement. A built environment is labeled as “pedestrian-oriented” if it has relatively high density, a mixture of land uses, a street network with high connectivity, human-scale streets and desirable aesthetic qualities (Cervero and Kockelman 1997). Because walking is emerging as an important form of moderateintensity physical activity and a practical health improvementmethod for the general public, public health is putting great effort into researching walking behavior (Owen et al. 2004).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSpace-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and China-
dc.titleThe influence of built environment on walking behavior: Measurement issues, theoretical considerations, modeling methodologies and chinese empirical studies-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-017-9205-9_5-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84943238447-
dc.identifier.spage53-
dc.identifier.epage75-

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