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Article: Association of children’s mobility and wellbeing: A case study in Hong Kong

TitleAssociation of children’s mobility and wellbeing: A case study in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2017
Citation
Travel Behaviour and Society, 2017, 9, p. 95-104 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study focuses on primary school children in Hong Kong, where we investigate their 1) travel behaviour and mobility (school and scheduled activities), 2) autonomy in daily lives (perceptions and self-esteem), 3) psychological wellbeing (how they rate their happiness in different situations) and 4) interrelationships of the above three aspects. The research team surveyed 393 primary school students at two selected schools, through face-to-face questionnaire surveys using a variety of question types, such as multiple choice, ordered category items and semantic differential ratings, providing respondents with the opportunity to convey their views within a reasonably structured format. It was found that a majority of children’s journeys associated with school and scheduled activities were completed on foot or by public transport, with over 80% accompanied by an adult. As expected, children engaging in active transport rated their journeys as happier than those using motorized transport. Accompanied children also rated their journeys as happier than their unaccompanied counterparts, suggesting that more research about independent mobility from the perspective of the children themselves is needed. Children who perceived themselves more capable of taking care of themselves independently rated their lives as happier than those perceiving themselves to be less able. The findings of this study suggest that children’s wellbeing can be affected by many factors, including their own self-esteem, perceived road safety, active travel and independent mobility, amongst other factors. Cities should plan for neighbourhoods safer for children to use, socialise and travel in, for the sake of promoting children’s wellbeing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243225
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLEUNG, YK-
dc.contributor.authorLoo, BPY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T02:51:53Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-25T02:51:53Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationTravel Behaviour and Society, 2017, 9, p. 95-104-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/243225-
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on primary school children in Hong Kong, where we investigate their 1) travel behaviour and mobility (school and scheduled activities), 2) autonomy in daily lives (perceptions and self-esteem), 3) psychological wellbeing (how they rate their happiness in different situations) and 4) interrelationships of the above three aspects. The research team surveyed 393 primary school students at two selected schools, through face-to-face questionnaire surveys using a variety of question types, such as multiple choice, ordered category items and semantic differential ratings, providing respondents with the opportunity to convey their views within a reasonably structured format. It was found that a majority of children’s journeys associated with school and scheduled activities were completed on foot or by public transport, with over 80% accompanied by an adult. As expected, children engaging in active transport rated their journeys as happier than those using motorized transport. Accompanied children also rated their journeys as happier than their unaccompanied counterparts, suggesting that more research about independent mobility from the perspective of the children themselves is needed. Children who perceived themselves more capable of taking care of themselves independently rated their lives as happier than those perceiving themselves to be less able. The findings of this study suggest that children’s wellbeing can be affected by many factors, including their own self-esteem, perceived road safety, active travel and independent mobility, amongst other factors. Cities should plan for neighbourhoods safer for children to use, socialise and travel in, for the sake of promoting children’s wellbeing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofTravel Behaviour and Society-
dc.titleAssociation of children’s mobility and wellbeing: A case study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLoo, BPY: bpyloo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLoo, BPY=rp00608-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tbs.2017.07.004-
dc.identifier.hkuros274271-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.spage95-
dc.identifier.epage104-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000410972000010-

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