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Article: Steroid phobia, Chinese medicine and asthma control

TitleSteroid phobia, Chinese medicine and asthma control
Authors
Keywordsasthma control
Chinese medicine
corticosteroid fears
Issue Date2017
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1752-699X
Citation
The Clinical Respiratory Journal, 2017, v. 12 n. 4, p. 1559-1564 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the mainstay of treatment for asthma. Corticosteroid (CS) phobia and fears are prevalent and these may influence therapeutic efficacy and asthma control. AIM: To evaluate if CS fear is associated with asthma control in children Methods: Patients aged > 4 years old with asthma at a pediatric outpatient clinic were surveyed, and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used for assessment of asthma control. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients and their parents were interviewed. Thirty-four (35%) parents reported moderate or significant CS fear. They were more likely than those with no or little fear to have poorer asthma control (mean ACT scores 21.3±4.0 versus 23.1±3.3, p=0.02), discuss their fears with their doctors (p<0.001), request CS sparing medications (p=0.044), and resort to Chinese medicine (CM) usage (p<0.001). Backward binomial logistic regression showed parents with moderate/significant fears were more likely to discuss their fears with their doctors (OR:5.21; 95% CI:1.86-14.59; p=0.002) and have used CM (OR:4.28; 95% CI:1.61-11.41; p=0.004). CS fear was not translated to reduced self-reported compliance in the prescribed ICS. About 40% of the respondents had ever used Chinese Medicine (CM) with 82% of the users reported having used Chinese herbal medicine and 49% had used cold moxibustion. CONCLUSIONS: CS fear and CM usage are prevalent. Parents with CS fear were more likely to have children with poorer asthma control and have used Chinese medicine. Physicians caring for children with asthma should be aware of parents with CS fear, prepared to address the fear or concerns, and offer evidence-based alternative treatment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248502
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.514
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.586
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, KI-
dc.contributor.authorHon, KL-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, YC-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, NHT-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:44:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:44:12Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationThe Clinical Respiratory Journal, 2017, v. 12 n. 4, p. 1559-1564-
dc.identifier.issn1752-6981-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248502-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the mainstay of treatment for asthma. Corticosteroid (CS) phobia and fears are prevalent and these may influence therapeutic efficacy and asthma control. AIM: To evaluate if CS fear is associated with asthma control in children Methods: Patients aged > 4 years old with asthma at a pediatric outpatient clinic were surveyed, and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) was used for assessment of asthma control. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients and their parents were interviewed. Thirty-four (35%) parents reported moderate or significant CS fear. They were more likely than those with no or little fear to have poorer asthma control (mean ACT scores 21.3±4.0 versus 23.1±3.3, p=0.02), discuss their fears with their doctors (p<0.001), request CS sparing medications (p=0.044), and resort to Chinese medicine (CM) usage (p<0.001). Backward binomial logistic regression showed parents with moderate/significant fears were more likely to discuss their fears with their doctors (OR:5.21; 95% CI:1.86-14.59; p=0.002) and have used CM (OR:4.28; 95% CI:1.61-11.41; p=0.004). CS fear was not translated to reduced self-reported compliance in the prescribed ICS. About 40% of the respondents had ever used Chinese Medicine (CM) with 82% of the users reported having used Chinese herbal medicine and 49% had used cold moxibustion. CONCLUSIONS: CS fear and CM usage are prevalent. Parents with CS fear were more likely to have children with poorer asthma control and have used Chinese medicine. Physicians caring for children with asthma should be aware of parents with CS fear, prepared to address the fear or concerns, and offer evidence-based alternative treatment.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1752-699X-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Clinical Respiratory Journal-
dc.subjectasthma control-
dc.subjectChinese medicine-
dc.subjectcorticosteroid fears-
dc.titleSteroid phobia, Chinese medicine and asthma control-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, NHT: leungnht@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, NHT=rp02256-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/crj.12705-
dc.identifier.pmid28876537-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85031401841-
dc.identifier.hkuros282353-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1559-
dc.identifier.epage1564-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000429581600029-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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