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Article: Long-term laboratory culture causes contrasting shifts in tolerance to two marine pollutants in copepods of the genus Tigriopus

TitleLong-term laboratory culture causes contrasting shifts in tolerance to two marine pollutants in copepods of the genus Tigriopus
Authors
KeywordsBioassays
Copper
Tributyltin
Multi-generational
Environmental stress
Issue Date2018
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/environment/journal/11356
Citation
Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2018, v. 25 n. 4, p. 3183-3192 How to Cite?
AbstractOrganismal chemical tolerance is often used to assess ecological risk and monitor water quality, yet tolerance can differ between field- and lab-raised organisms. In this study, we examined how tolerance to copper (Cu) and tributyltin oxide (TBTO) in two species of marine copepods, Tigriopus japonicus and T. californicus, changed across generations under benign laboratory culture (in the absence of pre-exposure to chemicals). Both copepod species exhibited similar chemical-specific changes in tolerance, with laboratory maintenance resulting in increased Cu tolerance and decreased TBTO tolerance. To assess potential factors underlying these patterns, chemical tolerance was measured in conjunction with candidate environmental variables (temperature, UV radiation, diet type, and starvation). The largest chemical-specific effect was found for starvation, which decreased TBTO tolerance but had no effect on Cu tolerance. Understanding how chemical-specific tolerance can change in the laboratory will be critical in strengthening bioassays and their applications for environmental protection and chemical management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249411
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.8
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.886
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, PY-
dc.contributor.authorFoley, HB-
dc.contributor.authorWu, L-
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, C-
dc.contributor.authorChaudhry, S-
dc.contributor.authorBao, VWW-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMY-
dc.contributor.authorEdmands, S-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T03:01:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-21T03:01:50Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research, 2018, v. 25 n. 4, p. 3183-3192-
dc.identifier.issn0944-1344-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249411-
dc.description.abstractOrganismal chemical tolerance is often used to assess ecological risk and monitor water quality, yet tolerance can differ between field- and lab-raised organisms. In this study, we examined how tolerance to copper (Cu) and tributyltin oxide (TBTO) in two species of marine copepods, Tigriopus japonicus and T. californicus, changed across generations under benign laboratory culture (in the absence of pre-exposure to chemicals). Both copepod species exhibited similar chemical-specific changes in tolerance, with laboratory maintenance resulting in increased Cu tolerance and decreased TBTO tolerance. To assess potential factors underlying these patterns, chemical tolerance was measured in conjunction with candidate environmental variables (temperature, UV radiation, diet type, and starvation). The largest chemical-specific effect was found for starvation, which decreased TBTO tolerance but had no effect on Cu tolerance. Understanding how chemical-specific tolerance can change in the laboratory will be critical in strengthening bioassays and their applications for environmental protection and chemical management.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/environment/journal/11356-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research-
dc.subjectBioassays-
dc.subjectCopper-
dc.subjectTributyltin-
dc.subjectMulti-generational-
dc.subjectEnvironmental stress-
dc.titleLong-term laboratory culture causes contrasting shifts in tolerance to two marine pollutants in copepods of the genus Tigriopus-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11356-017-0398-z-
dc.identifier.pmid29019110-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85030863990-
dc.identifier.hkuros282683-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage3183-
dc.identifier.epage3192-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000425008900019-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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