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Conference Paper: A methodology for estimating airborne virus exposures in indoor environments using the spatial distribution of expiratory aerosols and virus viability characteristics

TitleA methodology for estimating airborne virus exposures in indoor environments using the spatial distribution of expiratory aerosols and virus viability characteristics
Authors
KeywordsInfection risk
Virus-laden aerosols
Bacteriophages
Exposure
Hospital wards
Issue Date2008
Citation
Indoor Air, 2008, v. 18, n. 5, p. 425-438 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated the feasibility of using the spatial distribution of expiratory aerosols and the viability functions of airborne viruses to estimate exposures to airborne viruses in an indoor environment under imperfectly mixed condition. A method adopting this approach was tested in an air-conditioned hospital ward. Artificial coughs were produced by aerosolizing a simulated respiratory fluid containing a known concentration of benign bacteriophage. The bacteriophage exposures estimated on the basis of the spatial aerosol distributions and its viability function were in reasonable agreement with those measured directly by biological air sampling and culturing. The ventilation flow and coughing orientation were found to play significant roles in aerosol transport, leading to different spatial distribution patterns in bacteriophage exposure. Bacteriophage exposures decreased with lateral distance from the infector when the infector coughed vertically upward. In contrast, exposures were constant or even increased with distance in the case of lateral coughing. The possibility of incorporating the proposed exposure estimation into a dose-response model for infection risk assessment was discussed. The study has also demonstrated the potential application of viability functions of airborne viral pathogens in exposure assessment and infection risk analysis, which are often unavailable in literature for some important communicable diseases. © Blackwell Munksgaard 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256015
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.396
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.666
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSze To, G. N.-
dc.contributor.authorWan, M. P.-
dc.contributor.authorChao, C. Y.H.-
dc.contributor.authorWei, F.-
dc.contributor.authorYu, S. C.T.-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, J. K.C.-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-16T06:14:20Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-16T06:14:20Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2008, v. 18, n. 5, p. 425-438-
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256015-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the feasibility of using the spatial distribution of expiratory aerosols and the viability functions of airborne viruses to estimate exposures to airborne viruses in an indoor environment under imperfectly mixed condition. A method adopting this approach was tested in an air-conditioned hospital ward. Artificial coughs were produced by aerosolizing a simulated respiratory fluid containing a known concentration of benign bacteriophage. The bacteriophage exposures estimated on the basis of the spatial aerosol distributions and its viability function were in reasonable agreement with those measured directly by biological air sampling and culturing. The ventilation flow and coughing orientation were found to play significant roles in aerosol transport, leading to different spatial distribution patterns in bacteriophage exposure. Bacteriophage exposures decreased with lateral distance from the infector when the infector coughed vertically upward. In contrast, exposures were constant or even increased with distance in the case of lateral coughing. The possibility of incorporating the proposed exposure estimation into a dose-response model for infection risk assessment was discussed. The study has also demonstrated the potential application of viability functions of airborne viral pathogens in exposure assessment and infection risk analysis, which are often unavailable in literature for some important communicable diseases. © Blackwell Munksgaard 2008.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Air-
dc.subjectInfection risk-
dc.subjectVirus-laden aerosols-
dc.subjectBacteriophages-
dc.subjectExposure-
dc.subjectHospital wards-
dc.titleA methodology for estimating airborne virus exposures in indoor environments using the spatial distribution of expiratory aerosols and virus viability characteristics-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0668.2008.00544.x-
dc.identifier.pmid18691266-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-51849166832-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage425-
dc.identifier.epage438-
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0668-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000259236800009-

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