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Article: Effects of hands-free cellular phone conversational cognitive tasks on driving stability based on driving simulation experiment

TitleEffects of hands-free cellular phone conversational cognitive tasks on driving stability based on driving simulation experiment
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/trf
Citation
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 2018, v. 58, p. 264-281 How to Cite?
AbstractDriver distraction due to cellular phone usage is a major contributing factor to road crashes. This study compares the effects of conversational cognitive tasks using hands-free cellular phone on driving performance under three distraction conditions: (1) no distraction (no cellular conversation), (2) normal conversation (non-emotional cellular conversation), and (3) seven-level mathematical calculations. A car-following scenario was implemented using a driving simulator. Thirty young drivers with an average age of 24.1 years maintained a constant speed and distance between the subject vehicle and a leading vehicle on the driving simulator, and then respond to the leading vehicle’s emergency stop. The driving performances were assessed by collecting and statistically analyzing several variables of maneuver stability: the drivers’ brake reaction times, driving speed fluctuation, car-following distance undulation, and car-following time-headway undulation. The results revealed that normal conversation on a hands-free cellular phone impaired driving performance. The degree of impairment caused by normal calculation was equivalent to the distraction caused by Level 3 mathematical calculations according to the seven-level calculation baseline. The calculation difficulty of Level 3 is one double-digit figure plus a single-digit figure, and non-carry addition mental arithmetic is required, e.g., 44 + 4. The results indicated that an increase in the level of complexity of the calculation task was associated with an increase in brake reaction time. The seven-level calculation-task baseline could be applied to measure additional distraction effects on driving performance for further comparison.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256269
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.518
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.929
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, W-
dc.contributor.authorXiang, W-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SC-
dc.contributor.authorYan, X-
dc.contributor.authorLi, YC-
dc.contributor.authorHao, W-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T06:31:58Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-20T06:31:58Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 2018, v. 58, p. 264-281-
dc.identifier.issn1369-8478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256269-
dc.description.abstractDriver distraction due to cellular phone usage is a major contributing factor to road crashes. This study compares the effects of conversational cognitive tasks using hands-free cellular phone on driving performance under three distraction conditions: (1) no distraction (no cellular conversation), (2) normal conversation (non-emotional cellular conversation), and (3) seven-level mathematical calculations. A car-following scenario was implemented using a driving simulator. Thirty young drivers with an average age of 24.1 years maintained a constant speed and distance between the subject vehicle and a leading vehicle on the driving simulator, and then respond to the leading vehicle’s emergency stop. The driving performances were assessed by collecting and statistically analyzing several variables of maneuver stability: the drivers’ brake reaction times, driving speed fluctuation, car-following distance undulation, and car-following time-headway undulation. The results revealed that normal conversation on a hands-free cellular phone impaired driving performance. The degree of impairment caused by normal calculation was equivalent to the distraction caused by Level 3 mathematical calculations according to the seven-level calculation baseline. The calculation difficulty of Level 3 is one double-digit figure plus a single-digit figure, and non-carry addition mental arithmetic is required, e.g., 44 + 4. The results indicated that an increase in the level of complexity of the calculation task was associated with an increase in brake reaction time. The seven-level calculation-task baseline could be applied to measure additional distraction effects on driving performance for further comparison.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/trf-
dc.relation.ispartofTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleEffects of hands-free cellular phone conversational cognitive tasks on driving stability based on driving simulation experiment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, SC: hhecwsc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, YC: joeyliyc@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SC=rp00191-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trf.2018.06.023-
dc.identifier.hkuros285973-
dc.identifier.volume58-
dc.identifier.spage264-
dc.identifier.epage281-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000447357900024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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