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Article: China's adaptation to climate & urban climatic changes: A critical review

TitleChina's adaptation to climate & urban climatic changes: A critical review
Authors
KeywordsChina's adaptation straggles
Climate change
Urban climate
Issue Date2017
Citation
Urban Climate, 2017 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017. Since the conclusion of the 2014 Climate Summit in New York and the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris, China has been actively advancing its national policies on climate change mitigation and adaptation since more unpredictable extreme weather events are expected, which may incur a heavy cost in terms of economics and public health. Since China is still in the process of urbanisation, the greatest challenge it faces is finding a balance between economic growth and keeping carbon dioxide and greenhouse gas emission rates at a manageable level. Cities in China play a key role in the implementation of the central policies and make concrete actions in response to climate change. With reference to a series of recent policy papers and action plans as the background, this paper attempts to provide a critical overview of China's climate change action plans from the national to the city and urban level. It seeks to understand whether the proposed responses to climate change and strategies for actions on greening and air corridors for cities and urban areas are appropriate. It is found that for China to advance its urban climatic adaptation strategy there is a need for (1) urban data, (2) a cross-disciplinary impact assessment, and (3) the development of a market and policy transformation mechanism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/262754
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.775
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, Edward-
dc.contributor.authorRen, Chao-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-08T02:46:57Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-08T02:46:57Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationUrban Climate, 2017-
dc.identifier.issn2212-0955-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/262754-
dc.description.abstract© 2017. Since the conclusion of the 2014 Climate Summit in New York and the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris, China has been actively advancing its national policies on climate change mitigation and adaptation since more unpredictable extreme weather events are expected, which may incur a heavy cost in terms of economics and public health. Since China is still in the process of urbanisation, the greatest challenge it faces is finding a balance between economic growth and keeping carbon dioxide and greenhouse gas emission rates at a manageable level. Cities in China play a key role in the implementation of the central policies and make concrete actions in response to climate change. With reference to a series of recent policy papers and action plans as the background, this paper attempts to provide a critical overview of China's climate change action plans from the national to the city and urban level. It seeks to understand whether the proposed responses to climate change and strategies for actions on greening and air corridors for cities and urban areas are appropriate. It is found that for China to advance its urban climatic adaptation strategy there is a need for (1) urban data, (2) a cross-disciplinary impact assessment, and (3) the development of a market and policy transformation mechanism.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Climate-
dc.subjectChina's adaptation straggles-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectUrban climate-
dc.titleChina's adaptation to climate & urban climatic changes: A critical review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.uclim.2017.07.006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85025466168-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000426591900021-

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