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Article: The unmet provision of allergy services in Hong Kong impairs capability for allergy prevention – implications for the Asia Pacific region

TitleThe unmet provision of allergy services in Hong Kong impairs capability for allergy prevention – implications for the Asia Pacific region
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Asia Pacific
Allergy services
Training
Epidemiology
Prevention
Public health
Allergy centre
Issue Date2019
PublisherThe Allergy and Immunology Society of Thailand. The Journal's web site is located at http://apjai-journal.org/
Citation
Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy & Immunology, 2019, v. 37 n. 1, p. 1-8 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: There is a high and rising prevalence of many allergic diseases in the Asia Pacific, including Hong Kong (HK), which is unmatched by a commensurate provision of clinical allergy services. Method: This review highlights progress and deficiencies in allergy service and training in HK. The allergy work force was estimated from the numbers of doctors practicing allergy registered with the HK Medical Council Specialist Register in Immunology and Allergy; Paediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases (includes allergy); Paediatrics; and Immunology (as a discipline of Pathology). The numbers of trainees were estimated from the trainee lists of the Hong Kong Colleges of Physicians, Paediatrics and Pathology. The numbers of allergy clinics were estimated from existing services in Hospital Authority public hospitals in HK. Results: In the last 3 years, two new drug allergy clinics have been established in public hospitals, and for the first time in 20 years, Hong Kong has a trainee in adult allergy. The current ratio of allergists per head of population has improved slightly from 1:1.46 million in 2014 to 1:1.17 million, but it is still low compared to many countries. There are 5-fold more paediatric allergists than adult allergists per head of population in HK. Discussion: Hong Kong is not equipped to take advantage of major public health advances in allergy prevention. If the unbalance of adult to paediatric allergists remains uncorrected, continuing care for allergic children as they grow into adulthood will be an increasing problem. Conclusion: Hong Kong still has an unmet need for allergy specialists and is ill equipped to exploit recently discovered public health opportunities to prevent allergy. This review provides recommendations to improve allergy service provision and training, including the creation of Centres of Excellence in allergy to drive the growth of the specialty.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264248
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.247
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.560
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TH-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, TF-
dc.contributor.authorWong, G-
dc.contributor.authorHo, M-
dc.contributor.authorRosa Duque, J-
dc.contributor.authorLi, PH-
dc.contributor.authorLau, CS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WF-
dc.contributor.authorWu, A-
dc.contributor.authorChan, E-
dc.contributor.authorLai, C-
dc.contributor.authorLau, YL-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T07:51:54Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-22T07:51:54Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Pacific Journal of Allergy & Immunology, 2019, v. 37 n. 1, p. 1-8-
dc.identifier.issn0125-877X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264248-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: There is a high and rising prevalence of many allergic diseases in the Asia Pacific, including Hong Kong (HK), which is unmatched by a commensurate provision of clinical allergy services. Method: This review highlights progress and deficiencies in allergy service and training in HK. The allergy work force was estimated from the numbers of doctors practicing allergy registered with the HK Medical Council Specialist Register in Immunology and Allergy; Paediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases (includes allergy); Paediatrics; and Immunology (as a discipline of Pathology). The numbers of trainees were estimated from the trainee lists of the Hong Kong Colleges of Physicians, Paediatrics and Pathology. The numbers of allergy clinics were estimated from existing services in Hospital Authority public hospitals in HK. Results: In the last 3 years, two new drug allergy clinics have been established in public hospitals, and for the first time in 20 years, Hong Kong has a trainee in adult allergy. The current ratio of allergists per head of population has improved slightly from 1:1.46 million in 2014 to 1:1.17 million, but it is still low compared to many countries. There are 5-fold more paediatric allergists than adult allergists per head of population in HK. Discussion: Hong Kong is not equipped to take advantage of major public health advances in allergy prevention. If the unbalance of adult to paediatric allergists remains uncorrected, continuing care for allergic children as they grow into adulthood will be an increasing problem. Conclusion: Hong Kong still has an unmet need for allergy specialists and is ill equipped to exploit recently discovered public health opportunities to prevent allergy. This review provides recommendations to improve allergy service provision and training, including the creation of Centres of Excellence in allergy to drive the growth of the specialty.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Allergy and Immunology Society of Thailand. The Journal's web site is located at http://apjai-journal.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Pacific Journal of Allergy & Immunology-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectAsia Pacific-
dc.subjectAllergy services-
dc.subjectTraining-
dc.subjectEpidemiology-
dc.subjectPrevention-
dc.subjectPublic health-
dc.subjectAllergy centre-
dc.titleThe unmet provision of allergy services in Hong Kong impairs capability for allergy prevention – implications for the Asia Pacific region-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, M: marcoho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailRosa Duque, J: jsrduque@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, PH: liphilip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS: cslau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityRosa Duque, J=rp02340-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, PH=rp02669-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.12932/AP-250817-0150-
dc.identifier.pmid29223147-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85065078020-
dc.identifier.hkuros294867-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage8-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000467082900001-
dc.publisher.placeThailand-

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