File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Hydrology signal from GRACE gravity data in the Nelson River basin, Canada: a comparison of two approaches

TitleHydrology signal from GRACE gravity data in the Nelson River basin, Canada: a comparison of two approaches
Authors
KeywordsGravity Recovery and Climate Experiment
Hydrological signal separation
Glacial isostatic adjustment
Gravity signal
Western Canada
Nelson River basin
Gaussian filter
Issue Date2018
PublisherSpringerOpen, published in association with Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/40623
Citation
Earth, Planets and Space, 2018, v. 70 n. 1, article no. 41, p. 1-13 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission measures the combined gravity signal of several overlapping processes. A common approach to separate the hydrological signal in previous ice-covered regions is to apply numerical models to simulate the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signals related to the vanished ice load and then remove them from the observed GRACE data. However, the results of this method are strongly affected by the uncertainties of the ice and viscosity models of GIA. To avoid this, Wang et al. (Nat Geosci 6(1):38–42, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1038/NGEO1652; Geodesy Geodyn 6(4):267–273, 2015) followed the theory of Wahr et al. (Geophys Res Lett 22(8):977–980, 1995) and isolated water storage changes from GRACE in North America and Scandinavia with the help of Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Lambert et al. (Postglacial rebound and total water storage variations in the Nelson River drainage basin: a gravity GPS Study, Geological Survey of Canada Open File, 7317, 2013a, Geophys Res Lett 40(23):6118–6122, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013GL057973, 2013b) did a similar study for the Nelson River basin in North America but applying GPS and absolute gravity measurements. However, the results of the two studies in the Nelson River basin differ largely, especially for the magnitude of the hydrology signal which differs about 35%. Through detailed comparison and analysis of the input data, data post-processing techniques, methods and results of these two works, we find that the different GRACE data post-processing techniques may lead to this difference. Also the GRACE input has a larger effect on the hydrology signal amplitude than the GPS input in the Nelson River basin due to the relatively small uplift signal in this region. Meanwhile, the influence of the value of α, which represents the ratio between GIA-induced uplift rate and GIA-induced gravity-rate-of-change (before the correction for surface uplift), is more obvious in areas with high vertical uplift, but is smaller in the Nelson River basin. From Gaussian filtering of simulated data, we found that the magnitude of the peak gravity signal value can decrease significantly after Gaussian filtering with large average radius filter, but the effect in the Nelson River basin is rather small. More work is needed to understand the effect of amplitude restoration in the post-processing of GRACE g-dot signal. However, it is encouraging to find that both the methodologies of Wang et al. (2013, 2015) and Lambert et al. (2013a, b) can produce very similar results if their inputs are the same. This means that their methodologies can be applied to study the hydrology in other areas that are also affected by GIA provided that the effects of post-processing of their inputs are under control.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266063
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.056
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.012
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, T-
dc.contributor.authorWu, PPC-
dc.contributor.authorWang, HS-
dc.contributor.authorJia, LL-
dc.contributor.authorSteffen, H-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:41Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:41Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationEarth, Planets and Space, 2018, v. 70 n. 1, article no. 41, p. 1-13-
dc.identifier.issn1343-8832-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266063-
dc.description.abstractThe Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission measures the combined gravity signal of several overlapping processes. A common approach to separate the hydrological signal in previous ice-covered regions is to apply numerical models to simulate the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signals related to the vanished ice load and then remove them from the observed GRACE data. However, the results of this method are strongly affected by the uncertainties of the ice and viscosity models of GIA. To avoid this, Wang et al. (Nat Geosci 6(1):38–42, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1038/NGEO1652; Geodesy Geodyn 6(4):267–273, 2015) followed the theory of Wahr et al. (Geophys Res Lett 22(8):977–980, 1995) and isolated water storage changes from GRACE in North America and Scandinavia with the help of Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Lambert et al. (Postglacial rebound and total water storage variations in the Nelson River drainage basin: a gravity GPS Study, Geological Survey of Canada Open File, 7317, 2013a, Geophys Res Lett 40(23):6118–6122, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013GL057973, 2013b) did a similar study for the Nelson River basin in North America but applying GPS and absolute gravity measurements. However, the results of the two studies in the Nelson River basin differ largely, especially for the magnitude of the hydrology signal which differs about 35%. Through detailed comparison and analysis of the input data, data post-processing techniques, methods and results of these two works, we find that the different GRACE data post-processing techniques may lead to this difference. Also the GRACE input has a larger effect on the hydrology signal amplitude than the GPS input in the Nelson River basin due to the relatively small uplift signal in this region. Meanwhile, the influence of the value of α, which represents the ratio between GIA-induced uplift rate and GIA-induced gravity-rate-of-change (before the correction for surface uplift), is more obvious in areas with high vertical uplift, but is smaller in the Nelson River basin. From Gaussian filtering of simulated data, we found that the magnitude of the peak gravity signal value can decrease significantly after Gaussian filtering with large average radius filter, but the effect in the Nelson River basin is rather small. More work is needed to understand the effect of amplitude restoration in the post-processing of GRACE g-dot signal. However, it is encouraging to find that both the methodologies of Wang et al. (2013, 2015) and Lambert et al. (2013a, b) can produce very similar results if their inputs are the same. This means that their methodologies can be applied to study the hydrology in other areas that are also affected by GIA provided that the effects of post-processing of their inputs are under control.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringerOpen, published in association with Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/40623-
dc.relation.ispartofEarth, Planets and Space-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectGravity Recovery and Climate Experiment-
dc.subjectHydrological signal separation-
dc.subjectGlacial isostatic adjustment-
dc.subjectGravity signal-
dc.subjectWestern Canada-
dc.subjectNelson River basin-
dc.subjectGaussian filter-
dc.titleHydrology signal from GRACE gravity data in the Nelson River basin, Canada: a comparison of two approaches-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWu, PPC: ppwu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWu, PPC=rp01830-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40623-018-0804-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85043788711-
dc.identifier.hkuros296317-
dc.identifier.volume70-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 41, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 41, p. 13-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000427647600001-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats