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Article: The impact of e-book distribution on print sales: Analysis of a natural experiment

TitleThe impact of e-book distribution on print sales: Analysis of a natural experiment
Authors
KeywordsPublishing industry
Natural experiment
Digital distribution
Channel
Issue Date2019
Citation
Management Science, 2019, v. 65, n. 1, p. 19-31 How to Cite?
AbstractDigital distribution introduces many new strategic questions for the creative industries-notably, how the use of new digital channels will impact sales in established channels.We analyze this question in the context of e-book and hardcover sales by exploiting a natural experiment that exogenously delayed the release of a publisher's new Kindle e-books in April and May 2010. Using new books released simultaneously in e-book and print formats in March and June 2010 as the control group, we find that delaying e-book availability results in a 43.8% decrease in e-book sales but no increase in print book sales on Amazon.com or among other online or offline retailers. We also find that the decrease in e-book sales is greater for books with less prerelease buzz. Together, we find no evidence of strong cannibalization between print books and e-books in the short term and no support for the sequential distribution of books in print versions followed by e-book versions. Copyright: © 2018 INFORMS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267601
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.544
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.384
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, H-
dc.contributor.authorHu, YJ-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, MD-
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T04:08:29Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-22T04:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationManagement Science, 2019, v. 65, n. 1, p. 19-31-
dc.identifier.issn0025-1909-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267601-
dc.description.abstractDigital distribution introduces many new strategic questions for the creative industries-notably, how the use of new digital channels will impact sales in established channels.We analyze this question in the context of e-book and hardcover sales by exploiting a natural experiment that exogenously delayed the release of a publisher's new Kindle e-books in April and May 2010. Using new books released simultaneously in e-book and print formats in March and June 2010 as the control group, we find that delaying e-book availability results in a 43.8% decrease in e-book sales but no increase in print book sales on Amazon.com or among other online or offline retailers. We also find that the decrease in e-book sales is greater for books with less prerelease buzz. Together, we find no evidence of strong cannibalization between print books and e-books in the short term and no support for the sequential distribution of books in print versions followed by e-book versions. Copyright: © 2018 INFORMS.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofManagement Science-
dc.subjectPublishing industry-
dc.subjectNatural experiment-
dc.subjectDigital distribution-
dc.subjectChannel-
dc.titleThe impact of e-book distribution on print sales: Analysis of a natural experiment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1287/mnsc.2017.2940-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85055292372-
dc.identifier.volume65-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage19-
dc.identifier.epage31-
dc.identifier.eissn1526-5501-
dc.identifier.ssrn1966115-

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