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Article: The double hazard in recovery journey: The experiences of UK Chinese users of mental health services

TitleThe double hazard in recovery journey: The experiences of UK Chinese users of mental health services
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597
Citation
International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 2019, v. 65 n. 4, p. 271-278 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The recent interest in recovery from mental health problems has not meaningfully addressed the perspectives of ethnic minorities. Aim: To contribute to the discussion of recovery-oriented service with a study on the experience of Chinese people using UK mental health services. Methods: In-depth life history interviews were carried out with the users. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Four themes emerged as hindrances to personal recovery: (1) language difficulty creates hurdles, (2) diagnostic label is experienced as a double-edged sword, (3) treatment-related stigma and (dis)empowerment are identified, and (4) grievances are found in hospitalisation. Discussion: Having mental illness and being an ethnic minority in the UK experienced double hazard in their recovery journey. While the deprivation of agency and the stigma process in the health care system hinders their recovery, they are further disadvantaged by their ethnic minority status. Four pointers for service improvement, that apply to Chinese users in the United Kingdom and have general implications for users beyond this group, are proposed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270113
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.613
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, L-
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-20T05:09:50Z-
dc.date.available2019-05-20T05:09:50Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry, 2019, v. 65 n. 4, p. 271-278-
dc.identifier.issn0020-7640-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270113-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The recent interest in recovery from mental health problems has not meaningfully addressed the perspectives of ethnic minorities. Aim: To contribute to the discussion of recovery-oriented service with a study on the experience of Chinese people using UK mental health services. Methods: In-depth life history interviews were carried out with the users. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Four themes emerged as hindrances to personal recovery: (1) language difficulty creates hurdles, (2) diagnostic label is experienced as a double-edged sword, (3) treatment-related stigma and (dis)empowerment are identified, and (4) grievances are found in hospitalisation. Discussion: Having mental illness and being an ethnic minority in the UK experienced double hazard in their recovery journey. While the deprivation of agency and the stigma process in the health care system hinders their recovery, they are further disadvantaged by their ethnic minority status. Four pointers for service improvement, that apply to Chinese users in the United Kingdom and have general implications for users beyond this group, are proposed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105597-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry. Copyright © 2019 Sage Publications Ltd. [Doi: 10.1177/0020764019840059]-
dc.titleThe double hazard in recovery journey: The experiences of UK Chinese users of mental health services-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTang, L: lynntang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, L=rp02513-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0020764019840059-
dc.identifier.hkuros297865-
dc.identifier.volume65-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage271-
dc.identifier.epage278-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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