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Article: Short Version Dental Anxiety Inventory Score May Predict the Response in the Insular Cortex to Stimuli Mimicking Dental Treatment

TitleShort Version Dental Anxiety Inventory Score May Predict the Response in the Insular Cortex to Stimuli Mimicking Dental Treatment
Authors
Keywordsdental anxiety
dental equipment
emotions
functional neuroimaging
neurosciences
Issue Date2019
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/humanneuroscience/
Citation
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2019, v. 13, p. article no. 204 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Dental anxiety is a common reason for avoiding dental visits and is associated with poor dental status. The short version of Dental Anxiety Inventory (SDAxI) is an easy-to-use, multi-faceted questionnaire for assessing the level of trait dental anxiety. However, there was no neurophysiological data indicating if its score associates with the state anxiety when an individual is under real/mock dental environment. We hypothesized that there exists such an association. Materials and Methods: Twenty systemic healthy adults with dental attendance experience and self-claimed free of dental phobia were recruited in this cross-sectional study, with their dental anxiety level assessed by SDAxI. Functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded their brain signals in response to audiovisual footages resembling dental scaler or turbine in action. After the brain imaging, they gave fear ratings to the footages in visual analog scale (VAS). Results: Participants’ SDAxI scores positively correlated with their responses in the insular cortex (r2 = 0.388–0.445, P < 0.005). Their SDAxI scores also positively correlated with their fear ratings of the footages (r2 = 0.415–0.555, P < 0.005). Discussion: Our findings indicated a possible neurobiological relevance of SDAxI, and reinforced its neurobiological validity in assessing dental anxiety level of dental attenders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271217
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.673
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.841
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, AWK-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JCM-
dc.contributor.authorTanabe, HC-
dc.contributor.authorNg, SKS-
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WK-
dc.contributor.authorGoto, TK-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-24T01:05:38Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-24T01:05:38Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2019, v. 13, p. article no. 204-
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271217-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dental anxiety is a common reason for avoiding dental visits and is associated with poor dental status. The short version of Dental Anxiety Inventory (SDAxI) is an easy-to-use, multi-faceted questionnaire for assessing the level of trait dental anxiety. However, there was no neurophysiological data indicating if its score associates with the state anxiety when an individual is under real/mock dental environment. We hypothesized that there exists such an association. Materials and Methods: Twenty systemic healthy adults with dental attendance experience and self-claimed free of dental phobia were recruited in this cross-sectional study, with their dental anxiety level assessed by SDAxI. Functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded their brain signals in response to audiovisual footages resembling dental scaler or turbine in action. After the brain imaging, they gave fear ratings to the footages in visual analog scale (VAS). Results: Participants’ SDAxI scores positively correlated with their responses in the insular cortex (r2 = 0.388–0.445, P < 0.005). Their SDAxI scores also positively correlated with their fear ratings of the footages (r2 = 0.415–0.555, P < 0.005). Discussion: Our findings indicated a possible neurobiological relevance of SDAxI, and reinforced its neurobiological validity in assessing dental anxiety level of dental attenders.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/humanneuroscience/-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Human Neuroscience-
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectdental anxiety-
dc.subjectdental equipment-
dc.subjectemotions-
dc.subjectfunctional neuroimaging-
dc.subjectneurosciences-
dc.titleShort Version Dental Anxiety Inventory Score May Predict the Response in the Insular Cortex to Stimuli Mimicking Dental Treatment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, AWK: ndyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL: plkhong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK: ewkleung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, AWK=rp02143-
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp00019-
dc.identifier.authorityGoto, TK=rp01434-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2019.00204-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85069509798-
dc.identifier.hkuros298128-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 204-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 204-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000471592300001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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