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Article: Associations between commuting and well-being in the context of a compact city with a well-developed public transport system

TitleAssociations between commuting and well-being in the context of a compact city with a well-developed public transport system
Authors
KeywordsCommuting time
Commuting mode
Obesity
Satisfaction with life
Well-being
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/22141405
Citation
Journal of Transport & Health, 2019, v. 13, p. 103-114 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Negative impacts of long commuting time on people's well-being have been found in many suburbanized private car-dominant cities. However, there is a dearth of evidence regarding this association in a compact city with a well-developed public transport system. Taking Hong Kong as an example, the current study aims to explore the associations between modes of transport and commuting time with well-being. Methods: The study used the data of 990 commuters from the first wave of the Hong Kong Panel Survey for Poverty Alleviation in 2015. Multivariate logistic and linear regressions were used to test the associations of commuting time and commuting modes with well-being. The well-being outcomes included obesity measured by self-reported body mass index (BMI), mental distress (CHQ-12), self-rated health (SRH) and satisfaction with life (SWLS-5). Results: After the confounding variables were adjusted, significant association have been found between commuting time and satisfaction with life [-0.14, 95% CI: (−0.03, −0.00)]. More specifically, those who commute 60–89 min [-1.57, 95% CI: (−2.98, −0.16)], 90–119 min [-2.36, 95% CI (−4.56, −0.16)] and 120 min or more [-4.85, 95% CI (−9.11, −0.59)] report significantly lower satisfaction with life than those who commute within 30 min. Moreover, excessive commuting time (90–119 min) has been found significantly associated with obesity with an odd ratio of 2.80 [95% CI: (1.30–6.04)]. Conclusions: In Hong Kong, commuting time over 60 min is associated with negative satisfaction with life, and commuting time over 90 min is associated with higher risk of obesity. Policymakers of a compact city with a well-developed transport system should be informed of the negative impacts of long commuting time on well-being.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272337
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.418
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.463
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSha, F-
dc.contributor.authorLi, B-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, YW-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T10:40:21Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-20T10:40:21Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Transport & Health, 2019, v. 13, p. 103-114-
dc.identifier.issn2214-1405-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272337-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Negative impacts of long commuting time on people's well-being have been found in many suburbanized private car-dominant cities. However, there is a dearth of evidence regarding this association in a compact city with a well-developed public transport system. Taking Hong Kong as an example, the current study aims to explore the associations between modes of transport and commuting time with well-being. Methods: The study used the data of 990 commuters from the first wave of the Hong Kong Panel Survey for Poverty Alleviation in 2015. Multivariate logistic and linear regressions were used to test the associations of commuting time and commuting modes with well-being. The well-being outcomes included obesity measured by self-reported body mass index (BMI), mental distress (CHQ-12), self-rated health (SRH) and satisfaction with life (SWLS-5). Results: After the confounding variables were adjusted, significant association have been found between commuting time and satisfaction with life [-0.14, 95% CI: (−0.03, −0.00)]. More specifically, those who commute 60–89 min [-1.57, 95% CI: (−2.98, −0.16)], 90–119 min [-2.36, 95% CI (−4.56, −0.16)] and 120 min or more [-4.85, 95% CI (−9.11, −0.59)] report significantly lower satisfaction with life than those who commute within 30 min. Moreover, excessive commuting time (90–119 min) has been found significantly associated with obesity with an odd ratio of 2.80 [95% CI: (1.30–6.04)]. Conclusions: In Hong Kong, commuting time over 60 min is associated with negative satisfaction with life, and commuting time over 90 min is associated with higher risk of obesity. Policymakers of a compact city with a well-developed transport system should be informed of the negative impacts of long commuting time on well-being.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/22141405-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Transport & Health-
dc.subjectCommuting time-
dc.subjectCommuting mode-
dc.subjectObesity-
dc.subjectSatisfaction with life-
dc.subjectWell-being-
dc.titleAssociations between commuting and well-being in the context of a compact city with a well-developed public transport system-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, YW: flawhk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, YW=rp00561-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jth.2019.03.016-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85063864353-
dc.identifier.hkuros299355-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spage103-
dc.identifier.epage114-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000471920600013-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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