File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Amphiphilic additives in silicone oil tamponade and emulsification: An eye-on-a-chip study

TitleAmphiphilic additives in silicone oil tamponade and emulsification: An eye-on-a-chip study
Authors
Keywordsamphiphilic
emulsification
eye‐on‐a‐chip
silicone oil
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1755-375X&site=1
Citation
Acta Ophthalmologica, 2020, v. 98 n. 2, p. e232-e237 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: Recently, chain-end modified silicone oil (SiO) has been demonstrated as a reservoir for sustained release of intraocular drugs, many of which might be amphiphilic in nature. In this work, we study the effect of amphiphilic additives in SiO on emulsification under eye-like movements. Methods: Three SiO-soluble surfactants, namely DC749, MQ1640 and FZ2233, were used as model amphiphilic additives. The change of viscosity was measured by cone-and-plate method. The interfacial tension (IFT) between SiO and model aqueous phase was measured by pendant- drop-method. Emulsification of SiO was induced by simulated saccadic eye movements on a cell-coated eye-on-a-chip platform for 4 days. The number of emulsified SiO droplets observed in the aqueous phase was assessed daily by optical microscopy. Results: Significantly more emulsified droplets were formed in SiO with DC749 or MQ1640 (P<0.05). However, such increase was not directly related to the change in IFT nor viscosity. Moreover, a number of presumed water droplets were also found in SiO phase, which was not observed in the control SiO without additive. Conclusions: The amphiphilic substances in SiO promoted SiO emulsification. Besides typical SiO-in-water drops that normally affects the eye, a number of water-in-SiO drops were also formed. Before SiO could be considered as a vehicle for drug delivery, the nature of the drug and its possible effect on emulsification and therefore on the pharmacokinetics needs to be investigated. An additional concern is that water-in-oil droplets in the eye would affect the optical clarity of SiO and might cause visual symptoms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272722
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.362
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.473

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChan, YK-
dc.contributor.authorLau, LH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, DSH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, KWJ-
dc.contributor.authorShih, KC-
dc.contributor.authorLai, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorShum, HC-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:15:19Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:15:19Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationActa Ophthalmologica, 2020, v. 98 n. 2, p. e232-e237-
dc.identifier.issn1755-375X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272722-
dc.description.abstractAims: Recently, chain-end modified silicone oil (SiO) has been demonstrated as a reservoir for sustained release of intraocular drugs, many of which might be amphiphilic in nature. In this work, we study the effect of amphiphilic additives in SiO on emulsification under eye-like movements. Methods: Three SiO-soluble surfactants, namely DC749, MQ1640 and FZ2233, were used as model amphiphilic additives. The change of viscosity was measured by cone-and-plate method. The interfacial tension (IFT) between SiO and model aqueous phase was measured by pendant- drop-method. Emulsification of SiO was induced by simulated saccadic eye movements on a cell-coated eye-on-a-chip platform for 4 days. The number of emulsified SiO droplets observed in the aqueous phase was assessed daily by optical microscopy. Results: Significantly more emulsified droplets were formed in SiO with DC749 or MQ1640 (P<0.05). However, such increase was not directly related to the change in IFT nor viscosity. Moreover, a number of presumed water droplets were also found in SiO phase, which was not observed in the control SiO without additive. Conclusions: The amphiphilic substances in SiO promoted SiO emulsification. Besides typical SiO-in-water drops that normally affects the eye, a number of water-in-SiO drops were also formed. Before SiO could be considered as a vehicle for drug delivery, the nature of the drug and its possible effect on emulsification and therefore on the pharmacokinetics needs to be investigated. An additional concern is that water-in-oil droplets in the eye would affect the optical clarity of SiO and might cause visual symptoms.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1755-375X&site=1-
dc.relation.ispartofActa Ophthalmologica-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectamphiphilic-
dc.subjectemulsification-
dc.subjecteye‐on‐a‐chip-
dc.subjectsilicone oil-
dc.titleAmphiphilic additives in silicone oil tamponade and emulsification: An eye-on-a-chip study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLu, Y: luyj2019@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, YK: josephyk@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, KWJ: jwongkw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShih, KC: kcshih@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, JSM: laism@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShum, HC: ashum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YK=rp02536-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DSH=rp00516-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KWJ=rp02294-
dc.identifier.authorityShih, KC=rp01374-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, JSM=rp00295-
dc.identifier.authorityShum, HC=rp01439-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aos.14212-
dc.identifier.pmid31386804-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070512057-
dc.identifier.hkuros299694-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagee232-
dc.identifier.epagee237-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats