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Article: Suboptimal treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

TitleSuboptimal treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Authors
KeywordsNAFLD
dyslipidemia
LDL
cardiovascular disease risk
Framingham risk score
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH
Citation
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2020, v. 35 n. 2, p. 320-325 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & Aims: NAFLD patients often have dyslipidemia, and optimal treatment of dyslipidemia lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. We aimed to study the prescription of statin and low‐density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol treatment targets in NAFLD patients. Methods: Consecutive NAFLD patients attending five clinics in Asia were included in this study. The 10‐year cardiovascular disease risk was calculated based on the Framingham Heart Study, and patients were categorized as moderate, high or very high risk for cardiovascular disease based on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist 2017 Guidelines. The LDL‐cholesterol treatment goal for each of the risk groups was 2.6 mmol/l, 2.6 mmol/l and 1.8 mmol/l, respectively. Results: The data for 428 patients were analyzed (mean age 54.4 ± 11.1 years, 52.1% males). Dyslipidemia was seen in 60.5% (259/428) but only 43.2% (185/428) were on a statin. The percentage of patients who were at moderate, high and very high risk for cardiovascular disease was 36.7% (157/428), 27.3% (117/428) and 36.0% (154/428), respectively. Among patients who were on a statin, 58.9% (109/185) did not achieve the treatment target. Among patients who were not on a statin, 74.1% (180/243) should be receiving statin therapy. The percentage of patients who were not treated to target or who should be on statin was highest among patients at very high risk of cardiovascular disease at 79.6% (78/98) and 94.6% (53/56), respectively. Conclusions: This study highlights the suboptimal treatment of dyslipidemia and calls for action to improve the treatment of dyslipidemia in NAFLD patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272927
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.437
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.190

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, S-
dc.contributor.authorWong, VWS-
dc.contributor.authorGoh, GBB-
dc.contributor.authorFan, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WK-
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WK-
dc.contributor.authorChow, WC-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:19:13Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:19:13Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2020, v. 35 n. 2, p. 320-325-
dc.identifier.issn0815-9319-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272927-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Aims: NAFLD patients often have dyslipidemia, and optimal treatment of dyslipidemia lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. We aimed to study the prescription of statin and low‐density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol treatment targets in NAFLD patients. Methods: Consecutive NAFLD patients attending five clinics in Asia were included in this study. The 10‐year cardiovascular disease risk was calculated based on the Framingham Heart Study, and patients were categorized as moderate, high or very high risk for cardiovascular disease based on the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist 2017 Guidelines. The LDL‐cholesterol treatment goal for each of the risk groups was 2.6 mmol/l, 2.6 mmol/l and 1.8 mmol/l, respectively. Results: The data for 428 patients were analyzed (mean age 54.4 ± 11.1 years, 52.1% males). Dyslipidemia was seen in 60.5% (259/428) but only 43.2% (185/428) were on a statin. The percentage of patients who were at moderate, high and very high risk for cardiovascular disease was 36.7% (157/428), 27.3% (117/428) and 36.0% (154/428), respectively. Among patients who were on a statin, 58.9% (109/185) did not achieve the treatment target. Among patients who were not on a statin, 74.1% (180/243) should be receiving statin therapy. The percentage of patients who were not treated to target or who should be on statin was highest among patients at very high risk of cardiovascular disease at 79.6% (78/98) and 94.6% (53/56), respectively. Conclusions: This study highlights the suboptimal treatment of dyslipidemia and calls for action to improve the treatment of dyslipidemia in NAFLD patients.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectNAFLD-
dc.subjectdyslipidemia-
dc.subjectLDL-
dc.subjectcardiovascular disease risk-
dc.subjectFramingham risk score-
dc.titleSuboptimal treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSeto, WK: wkseto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySeto, WK=rp01659-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jgh.14794-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85073998287-
dc.identifier.hkuros300471-
dc.identifier.volume35-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage320-
dc.identifier.epage325-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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