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Article: Trawl ban in a heavily exploited marine environment: Responses in population dynamics of four stomatopod species

TitleTrawl ban in a heavily exploited marine environment: Responses in population dynamics of four stomatopod species
Authors
Keywordsbiomass
fishery management
Hong Kong
human
marine environment
Issue Date2018
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2018, v. 8 n. 1, p. article no. 17876 How to Cite?
AbstractIntensive trawling activities in Hong Kong waters have seriously depleted fishery resources and damaged marine benthic habitats over the last four decades. To minimize further destruction and rehabilitate fishery resources, the Hong Kong Government implemented a permanent territory-wide trawling closure on 31 December 2012. Such a trawl ban creates a unique opportunity to investigate recoveries in ecosystem structure and function following a major shift in disturbance regime by removing impacts from a major gear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dominant predatory mantis shrimps, including Harpiosquilla harpax, Miyakella nepa, Oratosquillina interrupta, and Oratosquilla oratoria would show signs of recovery following the trawl ban. Their population dynamics were investigated before and after the trawl ban. The results showed that their mean weight, mean carapace length and proportion of large-sized individuals increased significantly 3.5 years after the trawl ban, whilst their abundance, biomass and maximum length remained unchanged. This study suggests that the stomatopod assemblage in the human-dominated Hong Kong waters shows some initial signs of possible recovery following the trawl ban but also highlights the complexity of implementing fishery management and detecting changes resulted from management measures in a heavily urbanized seascape where many biotic and abiotic factors can influence their population dynamics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273180
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.122
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTao, LSR-
dc.contributor.authorLui, KKY-
dc.contributor.authorLau, ETC-
dc.contributor.authorHo, KKY-
dc.contributor.authorMak, YKY-
dc.contributor.authorSadovy de Mitcheson, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:24:01Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:24:01Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2018, v. 8 n. 1, p. article no. 17876-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273180-
dc.description.abstractIntensive trawling activities in Hong Kong waters have seriously depleted fishery resources and damaged marine benthic habitats over the last four decades. To minimize further destruction and rehabilitate fishery resources, the Hong Kong Government implemented a permanent territory-wide trawling closure on 31 December 2012. Such a trawl ban creates a unique opportunity to investigate recoveries in ecosystem structure and function following a major shift in disturbance regime by removing impacts from a major gear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dominant predatory mantis shrimps, including Harpiosquilla harpax, Miyakella nepa, Oratosquillina interrupta, and Oratosquilla oratoria would show signs of recovery following the trawl ban. Their population dynamics were investigated before and after the trawl ban. The results showed that their mean weight, mean carapace length and proportion of large-sized individuals increased significantly 3.5 years after the trawl ban, whilst their abundance, biomass and maximum length remained unchanged. This study suggests that the stomatopod assemblage in the human-dominated Hong Kong waters shows some initial signs of possible recovery following the trawl ban but also highlights the complexity of implementing fishery management and detecting changes resulted from management measures in a heavily urbanized seascape where many biotic and abiotic factors can influence their population dynamics.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectbiomass-
dc.subjectfishery management-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjecthuman-
dc.subjectmarine environment-
dc.titleTrawl ban in a heavily exploited marine environment: Responses in population dynamics of four stomatopod species-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTao, LSR: taoshiru@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSadovy de Mitcheson, Y: yjsadovy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySadovy de Mitcheson, Y=rp00773-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-35804-7-
dc.identifier.pmid30552339-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6294824-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85058654990-
dc.identifier.hkuros300554-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 17876-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 17876-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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