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Article: Association of free sugar intake with blood pressure and obesity measures in Australian adults

TitleAssociation of free sugar intake with blood pressure and obesity measures in Australian adults
Authors
KeywordsBlood pressure
Diet quality
Free sugar
Obesity
Overweight
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer (part of Springer Nature): Springer Open Choice Hybrid Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/journal/394
Citation
European Journal of Nutrition, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study examined the association of free sugar (FS) intake with obesity measures and blood pressure (BP) among a nationally representative sample of Australian adults. Methods: Data from adults (weighted n = 5136) who completed 2 × 24-h recalls and had complete data for BP, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed. Associations between percentage energy of FS from all food sources (%EFS total ), beverages only (%EFS beverages ), and non-beverages sources only (%EFS non-beverages ) and obesity measures and BP were examined using linear and non-linear regressions. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) of being classified as overweight and/or obese, having increased cardiometabolic risks, and elevated BP per 5% point increase in %EFS total , %EFS beverages , and %EFS non-beverages . All regression analyses were adjusted for known socio-economic and lifestyle confounders. Results: %EFS beverage was positively associated with BMI, WC, and WHtR (all p < 0.05), while %EFS non-beverage was inversely associated with these outcomes. Increases in odds of having an undesirable WC/WHtR were found with increasing %EFS beverages (OR per 5% point increase in %EFS beverages : 1.19 for WC; 1.23 for WHtR, both p < 0.001). %EFS total and %EFS non-beverages were weakly and negatively associated with diastolic BP. A 5% point increase in %EFS total and %EFS non-beverage was associated with a 10–25% reduction in odds of having elevated BP. Conclusions: Our results suggested that only a higher FS intake from beverages may be associated with obesity, and higher FS intake was associated with reduced odds of having elevated BP. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274290
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.664
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.337

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAhmad, R-
dc.contributor.authorMok, A-
dc.contributor.authorRangan, AM-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, JCY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:58:50Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:58:50Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Nutrition, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn1436-6207-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274290-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined the association of free sugar (FS) intake with obesity measures and blood pressure (BP) among a nationally representative sample of Australian adults. Methods: Data from adults (weighted n = 5136) who completed 2 × 24-h recalls and had complete data for BP, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed. Associations between percentage energy of FS from all food sources (%EFS total ), beverages only (%EFS beverages ), and non-beverages sources only (%EFS non-beverages ) and obesity measures and BP were examined using linear and non-linear regressions. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) of being classified as overweight and/or obese, having increased cardiometabolic risks, and elevated BP per 5% point increase in %EFS total , %EFS beverages , and %EFS non-beverages . All regression analyses were adjusted for known socio-economic and lifestyle confounders. Results: %EFS beverage was positively associated with BMI, WC, and WHtR (all p < 0.05), while %EFS non-beverage was inversely associated with these outcomes. Increases in odds of having an undesirable WC/WHtR were found with increasing %EFS beverages (OR per 5% point increase in %EFS beverages : 1.19 for WC; 1.23 for WHtR, both p < 0.001). %EFS total and %EFS non-beverages were weakly and negatively associated with diastolic BP. A 5% point increase in %EFS total and %EFS non-beverage was associated with a 10–25% reduction in odds of having elevated BP. Conclusions: Our results suggested that only a higher FS intake from beverages may be associated with obesity, and higher FS intake was associated with reduced odds of having elevated BP. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer (part of Springer Nature): Springer Open Choice Hybrid Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/journal/394-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Nutrition-
dc.subjectBlood pressure-
dc.subjectDiet quality-
dc.subjectFree sugar-
dc.subjectObesity-
dc.subjectOverweight-
dc.titleAssociation of free sugar intake with blood pressure and obesity measures in Australian adults-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, JCY: jimmyl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, JCY=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00394-019-01932-7-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85062687524-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85062687524-
dc.identifier.hkuros302031-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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