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Article: Cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the wrist: Comparison of sonographic, MRI, and cadaveric measurements.

TitleCross-sectional area of the median nerve at the wrist: Comparison of sonographic, MRI, and cadaveric measurements.
Authors
Keywordscross sectional
measurement
median nerve
MRI
ultrasound
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32273
Citation
Journal of Clinical Ultrasound, 2019, v. 47 n. 3, p. 122-127 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground This study compares median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements at the wrist obtained with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using cadaveric measurements as the gold standard. Methods Median nerve CSA was measured using US and MRI in 9 cadaveric wrists obtained from 5 subjects at 5 locations: distal forearm, proximal to tunnel inlet, at tunnel inlet, at tunnel outlet, and distal to tunnel outlet and then on identical cadaveric transverse sections obtained with a bandsaw. All US, MRI, and cadaveric measurements were repeated to determine reliability. Median nerves of 10 patients with clinical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were measured with US and MRI using an identical method US. Results Median nerve CSA MRI measurements correlated better (Pearson correlation: 0.80-0.95, P < .05) with cadaveric measurements than with US measurements (Pearson correlation: 0.61-0.79, P < .05). Median nerve CSA US measurements (8.6-12.5 mm(2), P < .05) were smaller at all levels than MRI (11.3-14.7 mm(2)) or cadaveric (11.0-14.9 mm(2)) measurements while MRI and cadaver measurements were similar at all levels. Median nerve CSA MRI measurements in CTS patients were larger than US measurements at all levels. Conclusion Median nerve CSA measurements by MRI are larger than US measurements and correlated better with cadaveric measurements. Median nerve CSA criteria used for diagnosing CTS on US are not likely to be applicable to MRI.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274573
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 0.978
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.305
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, RKL-
dc.contributor.authorGriffith, JF-
dc.contributor.authorNg, AWH-
dc.contributor.authorTipoe, GL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, AWH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CWY-
dc.contributor.authorTse, WL-
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T15:04:27Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T15:04:27Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Ultrasound, 2019, v. 47 n. 3, p. 122-127-
dc.identifier.issn0091-2751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274573-
dc.description.abstractBackground This study compares median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements at the wrist obtained with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using cadaveric measurements as the gold standard. Methods Median nerve CSA was measured using US and MRI in 9 cadaveric wrists obtained from 5 subjects at 5 locations: distal forearm, proximal to tunnel inlet, at tunnel inlet, at tunnel outlet, and distal to tunnel outlet and then on identical cadaveric transverse sections obtained with a bandsaw. All US, MRI, and cadaveric measurements were repeated to determine reliability. Median nerves of 10 patients with clinical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were measured with US and MRI using an identical method US. Results Median nerve CSA MRI measurements correlated better (Pearson correlation: 0.80-0.95, P < .05) with cadaveric measurements than with US measurements (Pearson correlation: 0.61-0.79, P < .05). Median nerve CSA US measurements (8.6-12.5 mm(2), P < .05) were smaller at all levels than MRI (11.3-14.7 mm(2)) or cadaveric (11.0-14.9 mm(2)) measurements while MRI and cadaver measurements were similar at all levels. Median nerve CSA MRI measurements in CTS patients were larger than US measurements at all levels. Conclusion Median nerve CSA measurements by MRI are larger than US measurements and correlated better with cadaveric measurements. Median nerve CSA criteria used for diagnosing CTS on US are not likely to be applicable to MRI.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32273-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Ultrasound-
dc.rightsPostprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectcross sectional-
dc.subjectmeasurement-
dc.subjectmedian nerve-
dc.subjectMRI-
dc.subjectultrasound-
dc.titleCross-sectional area of the median nerve at the wrist: Comparison of sonographic, MRI, and cadaveric measurements.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTipoe, GL: tgeorge@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTipoe, GL=rp00371-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jcu.22647-
dc.identifier.pmid30597562-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85059281304-
dc.identifier.hkuros301235-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage122-
dc.identifier.epage127-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000460660200004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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