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Article: One of us? How facial and symbolic cues to own- versus other-race membership influence access to perceptual awareness

TitleOne of us? How facial and symbolic cues to own- versus other-race membership influence access to perceptual awareness
Authors
KeywordsOwn-race bias
Face processing
Breaking continuous flash suppression (b-CFS)
Interocular suppression
Associative training
Perceptual awareness
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cognit
Citation
Cognition, 2019, v. 184, p. 19-27 How to Cite?
AbstractInformation that conveys racial group membership plays a powerful role in influencing people’s information processing including perceptual, memory and evaluative judgments. Yet whether own- and other-race information can differentially impact people’s perceptual awareness at a preconscious level remains unclear. Employing a breaking continuous flash suppression (b-CFS) paradigm, we investigated whether compared with other-race stimuli, participants’ own-race stimuli would be prioritized to gain privileged access to perceptual awareness. Across five experiments (N = 136), we firstly found that participants’ own-race faces enjoyed privileged access to perceptual awareness (Experiment 1). In Experiments 2–5, we employed an associative training task to establish associations between otherwise arbitrary visual stimuli and own- vs. other-racial groups. Although otherwise arbitrary visual stimuli were prioritized to represent one’s own race (vs. other-race) during the training, own- and other-race representing stimuli did not differ in their potency in entering perceptual awareness. This dissociation was further corroborated by Bayesian analyses and an internal meta-analysis. Taken together, our findings suggest that people’s perceptual expertise with their own-race members’ faces plays a determining role in shaping perceptual awareness. In contrast, newly learned race-representing stimuli did not influence early perceptual selection processes as indicated by the time they take to emerge into perceptual awareness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274745
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.294
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.770
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYuan, J-
dc.contributor.authorHu, X-
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorBodenhausen, GV-
dc.contributor.authorFu, S-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:27:50Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:27:50Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationCognition, 2019, v. 184, p. 19-27-
dc.identifier.issn0010-0277-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274745-
dc.description.abstractInformation that conveys racial group membership plays a powerful role in influencing people’s information processing including perceptual, memory and evaluative judgments. Yet whether own- and other-race information can differentially impact people’s perceptual awareness at a preconscious level remains unclear. Employing a breaking continuous flash suppression (b-CFS) paradigm, we investigated whether compared with other-race stimuli, participants’ own-race stimuli would be prioritized to gain privileged access to perceptual awareness. Across five experiments (N = 136), we firstly found that participants’ own-race faces enjoyed privileged access to perceptual awareness (Experiment 1). In Experiments 2–5, we employed an associative training task to establish associations between otherwise arbitrary visual stimuli and own- vs. other-racial groups. Although otherwise arbitrary visual stimuli were prioritized to represent one’s own race (vs. other-race) during the training, own- and other-race representing stimuli did not differ in their potency in entering perceptual awareness. This dissociation was further corroborated by Bayesian analyses and an internal meta-analysis. Taken together, our findings suggest that people’s perceptual expertise with their own-race members’ faces plays a determining role in shaping perceptual awareness. In contrast, newly learned race-representing stimuli did not influence early perceptual selection processes as indicated by the time they take to emerge into perceptual awareness.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cognit-
dc.relation.ispartofCognition-
dc.subjectOwn-race bias-
dc.subjectFace processing-
dc.subjectBreaking continuous flash suppression (b-CFS)-
dc.subjectInterocular suppression-
dc.subjectAssociative training-
dc.subjectPerceptual awareness-
dc.titleOne of us? How facial and symbolic cues to own- versus other-race membership influence access to perceptual awareness-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHu, X: xqhu2716@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHu, X=rp02182-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cognition.2018.12.003-
dc.identifier.pmid30557747-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85058385779-
dc.identifier.hkuros302618-
dc.identifier.volume184-
dc.identifier.spage19-
dc.identifier.epage27-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000457513200003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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