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Article: Improving accuracy in building energy simulation via evaluating occupant behaviours: a case study in Hong Kong

TitleImproving accuracy in building energy simulation via evaluating occupant behaviours: a case study in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsEnergy simulation
High-rise building
Occupant behavior
Post occupancy evaluation
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild
Citation
Energy and Buildings, 2019, v. 202, article no. 109373 How to Cite?
AbstractOccupant behavior plays a critical role in building energy consumption, particularly in residential buildings. However, occupant behavior is complicated and varies significantly from case to case. Also, energy modeling of high-rise buildings is far less explored than that of low- or medium-rise buildings. This paper aims to improve accuracy in building energy simulation by utilizing Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) data to calibrate energy model. Drawing on a review of the literature of occupant behavior and building energy modeling, the paper provides a calibration method of integrating POE data into an energy model, which is demonstrated using a real-life typical 40-storey residential building in Hong Kong. The developed method addresses seven updated input parameters, namely, schedule, devices, air-conditioners, windows, lights, domestic hot water, and cooking. By comparing the two energy modeling processes, i.e. with and without POE input, and their resultant estimated energy consumption, the paper quantifies the impact of occupant behavior on building energy consumption. Annual metered data together with energy bills obtained from the POE were utilized to validate the models. The results show that the use of the developed POE-integrated method helped to improve accuracy in energy consumption prediction by 14% for the total building floor area and by 16% for the total residential area. From examining the impacts of the seven input parameters, the paper reveals the key energy use sensitive occupant behaviors within high-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong. These include: the number of residents in each unit; adoption of window type and split type of air-conditioners; window and air condition operation modes; cooking time on weekdays and weekends; and time spent on hot water showering. The developed method can assist building designers and services engineers to estimate building energy use more accurately and provides a scenario analysis tool for clients and facility managers to develop effective energy conservation strategies. © 2019
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274841
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.867
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, C-
dc.contributor.authorDu, J-
dc.contributor.authorPan, W-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:29:57Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:29:57Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEnergy and Buildings, 2019, v. 202, article no. 109373-
dc.identifier.issn0378-7788-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274841-
dc.description.abstractOccupant behavior plays a critical role in building energy consumption, particularly in residential buildings. However, occupant behavior is complicated and varies significantly from case to case. Also, energy modeling of high-rise buildings is far less explored than that of low- or medium-rise buildings. This paper aims to improve accuracy in building energy simulation by utilizing Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) data to calibrate energy model. Drawing on a review of the literature of occupant behavior and building energy modeling, the paper provides a calibration method of integrating POE data into an energy model, which is demonstrated using a real-life typical 40-storey residential building in Hong Kong. The developed method addresses seven updated input parameters, namely, schedule, devices, air-conditioners, windows, lights, domestic hot water, and cooking. By comparing the two energy modeling processes, i.e. with and without POE input, and their resultant estimated energy consumption, the paper quantifies the impact of occupant behavior on building energy consumption. Annual metered data together with energy bills obtained from the POE were utilized to validate the models. The results show that the use of the developed POE-integrated method helped to improve accuracy in energy consumption prediction by 14% for the total building floor area and by 16% for the total residential area. From examining the impacts of the seven input parameters, the paper reveals the key energy use sensitive occupant behaviors within high-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong. These include: the number of residents in each unit; adoption of window type and split type of air-conditioners; window and air condition operation modes; cooking time on weekdays and weekends; and time spent on hot water showering. The developed method can assist building designers and services engineers to estimate building energy use more accurately and provides a scenario analysis tool for clients and facility managers to develop effective energy conservation strategies. © 2019-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild-
dc.relation.ispartofEnergy and Buildings-
dc.subjectEnergy simulation-
dc.subjectHigh-rise building-
dc.subjectOccupant behavior-
dc.subjectPost occupancy evaluation-
dc.titleImproving accuracy in building energy simulation via evaluating occupant behaviours: a case study in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPan, W: wpan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPan, W=rp01621-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.enbuild.2019.109373-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070906230-
dc.identifier.hkuros302540-
dc.identifier.volume202-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 109373-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 109373-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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