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Article: Seasonal pattern of single falls and recurrent falls among community-dwelling older adults first applying for long-term care services in Hong Kong

TitleSeasonal pattern of single falls and recurrent falls among community-dwelling older adults first applying for long-term care services in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsolder people
recurrent fall
seasonal pattern
single fall
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Age and Ageing, 2020, v. 49 n. 1, p. 125-129 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: few studies had investigated seasonal pattern of recurrent falls. OBJECTIVE: to examine seasonal pattern of both single and recurrent falls amongst community-dwelling older adults first applying for long-term care (LTC) services. METHODS: a cohort of 89,100 community-dwelling Hong Kong older adults aged 65 and over first applying for LTC services from 2005 to 2014 was obtained. Logistic regression models were used to examine seasonal pattern in single and recurrent falls, whilst controlling for gender, age and year. RESULTS: amongst 89,100 older adults, about 32% fell in past 90 days. Amongst the fallers, 34% fell recurrently. In 2014, the incidences of all fall, single fall and recurrent fall were 1.95, 0.80 and 1.15 per person-years, respectively. For single falls, the 90-day fall risk was highest during November to February with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.41), compared with the lowest one during July to October. For recurrent falls, the highest OR for 90-day risk was highest during November to February (1.46, 95% CI 1.31-1.64) as well. CONCLUSIONS: single and recurrent falls both peaked during winter months. Interventions, such as implementing educational publicity and sending reminder to older adults in fall season, may be considered. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277372
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.013
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.611

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQian, X-
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, CW-
dc.contributor.authorLou, VW-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYM-
dc.contributor.authorHo, MM-
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorChi, I-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-20T08:49:49Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-20T08:49:49Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAge and Ageing, 2020, v. 49 n. 1, p. 125-129-
dc.identifier.issn0002-0729-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277372-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: few studies had investigated seasonal pattern of recurrent falls. OBJECTIVE: to examine seasonal pattern of both single and recurrent falls amongst community-dwelling older adults first applying for long-term care (LTC) services. METHODS: a cohort of 89,100 community-dwelling Hong Kong older adults aged 65 and over first applying for LTC services from 2005 to 2014 was obtained. Logistic regression models were used to examine seasonal pattern in single and recurrent falls, whilst controlling for gender, age and year. RESULTS: amongst 89,100 older adults, about 32% fell in past 90 days. Amongst the fallers, 34% fell recurrently. In 2014, the incidences of all fall, single fall and recurrent fall were 1.95, 0.80 and 1.15 per person-years, respectively. For single falls, the 90-day fall risk was highest during November to February with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.41), compared with the lowest one during July to October. For recurrent falls, the highest OR for 90-day risk was highest during November to February (1.46, 95% CI 1.31-1.64) as well. CONCLUSIONS: single and recurrent falls both peaked during winter months. Interventions, such as implementing educational publicity and sending reminder to older adults in fall season, may be considered. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAge and Ageing-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectolder people-
dc.subjectrecurrent fall-
dc.subjectseasonal pattern-
dc.subjectsingle fall-
dc.titleSeasonal pattern of single falls and recurrent falls among community-dwelling older adults first applying for long-term care services in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwan, CW: cwkwan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VW: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, MM: mandyho1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VW=rp00607-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, MM=rp02226-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ageing/afz139-
dc.identifier.pmid31763678-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076585525-
dc.identifier.hkuros305589-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage125-
dc.identifier.epage129-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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