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Article: Controversy Around Airborne Versus Droplet Transmission Of Respiratory Viruses - Implication For Infection Prevention

TitleControversy Around Airborne Versus Droplet Transmission Of Respiratory Viruses - Implication For Infection Prevention
Authors
Keywordsaerosol
droplet
healthcare settings
infection control
respiratory viruses
Issue Date2019
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-infectiousdiseases.com
Citation
Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 32 n. 4, p. 372-379 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose of review Health agencies recommend transmission-based precautions, including contact, droplet and airborne precautions, to mitigate transmission of respiratory viruses in healthcare settings. There is particular controversy over the importance of aerosol transmission and whether airborne precautions should be recommended for some respiratory viruses. Here, we review the current recommendations of transmission-based precautions and the latest evidence on the aerosol transmission of respiratory viruses. Recent findings Viral nucleic acids, and in some instances viable viruses, have been detected in aerosols in the air in healthcare settings for some respiratory viruses such as seasonal and avian influenza viruses, Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus and respiratory syncytial virus. However, current evidences are yet to demonstrate that these viruses can effectively spread via airborne route between individuals, or whether preventive measures in airborne precautions would be effective. Summary Studies that use transmission events as outcome to demonstrate human-to-human transmission over the aerosol route or quantitative measurement of infectious respiratory viruses in the air are needed to evaluate the infectiousness of respiratory viruses over the aerosol route. When a respiratory virus in concern only leads to disease with low severity, airborne precautions are not likely to be justified.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277729
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.577
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.242
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShiu, EYC-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, NHL-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-04T08:00:09Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-04T08:00:09Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 32 n. 4, p. 372-379-
dc.identifier.issn0951-7375-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277729-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of review Health agencies recommend transmission-based precautions, including contact, droplet and airborne precautions, to mitigate transmission of respiratory viruses in healthcare settings. There is particular controversy over the importance of aerosol transmission and whether airborne precautions should be recommended for some respiratory viruses. Here, we review the current recommendations of transmission-based precautions and the latest evidence on the aerosol transmission of respiratory viruses. Recent findings Viral nucleic acids, and in some instances viable viruses, have been detected in aerosols in the air in healthcare settings for some respiratory viruses such as seasonal and avian influenza viruses, Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus and respiratory syncytial virus. However, current evidences are yet to demonstrate that these viruses can effectively spread via airborne route between individuals, or whether preventive measures in airborne precautions would be effective. Summary Studies that use transmission events as outcome to demonstrate human-to-human transmission over the aerosol route or quantitative measurement of infectious respiratory viruses in the air are needed to evaluate the infectiousness of respiratory viruses over the aerosol route. When a respiratory virus in concern only leads to disease with low severity, airborne precautions are not likely to be justified.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-infectiousdiseases.com-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 2019, v. 32 n. 4, p. 372-379-
dc.subjectaerosol-
dc.subjectdroplet-
dc.subjecthealthcare settings-
dc.subjectinfection control-
dc.subjectrespiratory viruses-
dc.titleControversy Around Airborne Versus Droplet Transmission Of Respiratory Viruses - Implication For Infection Prevention-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, NHL: nanleung@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, NHL=rp02637-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/QCO.0000000000000563-
dc.identifier.pmid31259864-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85068963897-
dc.identifier.hkuros306064-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage372-
dc.identifier.epage379-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000480714700011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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