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Article: Rapid Biofilm Eradication on Bone Implants Using Red Phosphorus and Near-Infrared Light

TitleRapid Biofilm Eradication on Bone Implants Using Red Phosphorus and Near-Infrared Light
Authors
Keywordsantibiofilm
bone‐implants
osteogenic differentiation
photothermal therapy
red phosphorus
Issue Date2018
PublisherWiley - VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/publish/en/journals/alphabeticIndex/2089
Citation
Advanced Materials, 2018, v. 30 n. 31, p. article no. 1801808 How to Cite?
AbstractBone‐implant‐associated infections are common after orthopedic surgery due to impaired host immune response around the implants. In particular, when a biofilm develops, the immune system and antibiotic treatment find it difficult to eradicate, which sometimes requires a second operation to replace the infected implants. Most strategies have been designed to prevent biofilms from forming on the surface of bone implants, but these strategies cannot eliminate the biofilm when it has been established in vivo. To address this issue, a nonsurgical, noninvasive treatment for biofilm infection must be developed. Herein, a red‐phosphorus–IR780–arginine–glycine–aspartic‐acid–cysteine coating on titanium bone implants is prepared. The red phosphorus has great biocompatibility and exhibits efficient photothermal ability. The temperature sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm is enhanced in the presence of singlet oxygen (1O2) produced by IR780. Without damaging the normal tissue, the biofilm can be eradicated through a safe near‐infrared (808 nm) photothermal therapy at 50 °C in vitro and in vivo. This approach reaches an antibacterial efficiency of 96.2% in vivo with 10 min of irradiation at 50 °C. Meanwhile, arginine–glycine–aspartic‐acid–cysteine decorated on the surface of the implant can improve the cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278227
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 27.398
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 9.021
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTAN, L-
dc.contributor.authorLI, J-
dc.contributor.authorLIU, X-
dc.contributor.authorCUI, Z-
dc.contributor.authorYANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorZHU, S-
dc.contributor.authorLI, Z-
dc.contributor.authorYUAN, X-
dc.contributor.authorZHENG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KWK-
dc.contributor.authorPAN, H-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorWU, S-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-04T08:09:56Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-04T08:09:56Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationAdvanced Materials, 2018, v. 30 n. 31, p. article no. 1801808-
dc.identifier.issn0935-9648-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278227-
dc.description.abstractBone‐implant‐associated infections are common after orthopedic surgery due to impaired host immune response around the implants. In particular, when a biofilm develops, the immune system and antibiotic treatment find it difficult to eradicate, which sometimes requires a second operation to replace the infected implants. Most strategies have been designed to prevent biofilms from forming on the surface of bone implants, but these strategies cannot eliminate the biofilm when it has been established in vivo. To address this issue, a nonsurgical, noninvasive treatment for biofilm infection must be developed. Herein, a red‐phosphorus–IR780–arginine–glycine–aspartic‐acid–cysteine coating on titanium bone implants is prepared. The red phosphorus has great biocompatibility and exhibits efficient photothermal ability. The temperature sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm is enhanced in the presence of singlet oxygen (1O2) produced by IR780. Without damaging the normal tissue, the biofilm can be eradicated through a safe near‐infrared (808 nm) photothermal therapy at 50 °C in vitro and in vivo. This approach reaches an antibacterial efficiency of 96.2% in vivo with 10 min of irradiation at 50 °C. Meanwhile, arginine–glycine–aspartic‐acid–cysteine decorated on the surface of the implant can improve the cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley - VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/publish/en/journals/alphabeticIndex/2089-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvanced Materials-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectantibiofilm-
dc.subjectbone‐implants-
dc.subjectosteogenic differentiation-
dc.subjectphotothermal therapy-
dc.subjectred phosphorus-
dc.titleRapid Biofilm Eradication on Bone Implants Using Red Phosphorus and Near-Infrared Light-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, KWK: wkkyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, KWK=rp00309-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201801808-
dc.identifier.pmid29923229-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85047659193-
dc.identifier.hkuros306873-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue31-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1801808-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1801808-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000443807400002-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-
dc.identifier.issnl0935-9648-

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