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Article: A Study of the Characteristics of Suicide Notes in China

TitleA Study of the Characteristics of Suicide Notes in China
Authors
Keywordssuicide notes
suicide risks
Shanghai
Issue Date2020
PublisherHogrefe Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hogrefe.com/periodicals/crisis-the-journal-of-crisis-intervention-and-suicide-prevention/
Citation
Crisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention, 2020, v. 41, p. 32-38 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Suicide notes in China are rarely studied and seldom available. Aims: This study examines the characteristics of suicide note leavers and analyzes the contents of their suicide notes for the period of 2004–2016 in Pudong, Shanghai, which has more than 5.5 million inhabitants. Method: The characteristics of the note leavers (n = 458) and those who left no notes (n = 1949) were compared. Four major groupings of the suicide note content were identified, namely, addressees, mandates/requests, expressions, and difficulties. Results: Only 19.0% of the deceased left suicide notes and they were characterized by having no diagnosed psychiatric illnesses, being in debt, having a high education level, having made no previous suicide attempts, and having used suicide methods that required preparation. Wanting to hide their suicide information was not uncommon for these individuals (9.7%). Adolescents were likely to mention a negative interpersonal relationship with someone (27.4%). Illnesses/pain was frequently mentioned by adults (33.4%) and older people (61.5%). Limitations: Many features of suicide notes, e.g., interpersonal features of suicides, were not examined. Conclusion: Education level might be a key factor influencing the likelihood of leaving suicide notes. Most people who left suicide notes showed a negative attitude toward suicidal behavior. The myth of an afterlife should also be addressed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278563
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.583
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.638

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, F-
dc.contributor.authorLu, X-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:09:51Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:09:51Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationCrisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention, 2020, v. 41, p. 32-38-
dc.identifier.issn0227-5910-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278563-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Suicide notes in China are rarely studied and seldom available. Aims: This study examines the characteristics of suicide note leavers and analyzes the contents of their suicide notes for the period of 2004–2016 in Pudong, Shanghai, which has more than 5.5 million inhabitants. Method: The characteristics of the note leavers (n = 458) and those who left no notes (n = 1949) were compared. Four major groupings of the suicide note content were identified, namely, addressees, mandates/requests, expressions, and difficulties. Results: Only 19.0% of the deceased left suicide notes and they were characterized by having no diagnosed psychiatric illnesses, being in debt, having a high education level, having made no previous suicide attempts, and having used suicide methods that required preparation. Wanting to hide their suicide information was not uncommon for these individuals (9.7%). Adolescents were likely to mention a negative interpersonal relationship with someone (27.4%). Illnesses/pain was frequently mentioned by adults (33.4%) and older people (61.5%). Limitations: Many features of suicide notes, e.g., interpersonal features of suicides, were not examined. Conclusion: Education level might be a key factor influencing the likelihood of leaving suicide notes. Most people who left suicide notes showed a negative attitude toward suicidal behavior. The myth of an afterlife should also be addressed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHogrefe Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hogrefe.com/periodicals/crisis-the-journal-of-crisis-intervention-and-suicide-prevention/-
dc.relation.ispartofCrisis: the journal of crisis intervention and suicide prevention-
dc.rightsPreprint The manuscript was prepared [Date] and the manuscript in this form has not yet been accepted for publication. Accepted manuscript version This version of the article may not completely replicate the final authoritative version published in [journal title] at [DOI]. It is not the version of record and is therefore not suitable for citation. Please do not copy or cite without the permission of the author(s).-
dc.subjectsuicide notes-
dc.subjectsuicide risks-
dc.subjectShanghai-
dc.titleA Study of the Characteristics of Suicide Notes in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1027/0227-5910/a000601-
dc.identifier.pmid31140317-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85066440656-
dc.identifier.hkuros307953-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.spage32-
dc.identifier.epage38-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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