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Conference Paper: Does Being Envied and Ostracized Make Employees Unethical?

TitleDoes Being Envied and Ostracized Make Employees Unethical?
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherAcademy of Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aomonline.org/aom.asp?id=156
Citation
The 79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management: Understanding the Inclusive Organization, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 9-13 August 2019. In Academy of Management Proceedings, 2019, v. 2019 n. 1, abstract no. 10832 How to Cite?
AbstractConcern has been growing about employees’ poor ethical judgment, which hurts their organizations’ business interests. While leaders play significant roles in affecting employees’ ethical judgment, the roles of coworkers have been largely ignored. Addressing this gap, the goal of this study is to examine whether, why, and when perceptions of being envied and ostracized by coworkers are related to unethical judgment. Guided by Affective Events Theory, which proposes that affective events at work create emotions that produce affect-laden outcomes, we argue that an employee’s perception that coworkers are giving him or her the “silent treatment” breeds anger, which in turn promotes unethical judgment. Data collected from 258 college-graduate employees at three points over an 8-month period supported the proposed relationships. In addition, we found that ethical leadership buffered the effects of perceptions of being envied and ostracized on anger. These findings contribute to the literature by showing that perceptions of coworkers’ mistreatment can increase employees’ unethical judgment, but that managers’ ethical leadership is an important means of alleviating these effects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278984
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSu, C-
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:17:30Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:17:30Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationThe 79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management: Understanding the Inclusive Organization, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 9-13 August 2019. In Academy of Management Proceedings, 2019, v. 2019 n. 1, abstract no. 10832-
dc.identifier.issn2151-6561-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278984-
dc.description.abstractConcern has been growing about employees’ poor ethical judgment, which hurts their organizations’ business interests. While leaders play significant roles in affecting employees’ ethical judgment, the roles of coworkers have been largely ignored. Addressing this gap, the goal of this study is to examine whether, why, and when perceptions of being envied and ostracized by coworkers are related to unethical judgment. Guided by Affective Events Theory, which proposes that affective events at work create emotions that produce affect-laden outcomes, we argue that an employee’s perception that coworkers are giving him or her the “silent treatment” breeds anger, which in turn promotes unethical judgment. Data collected from 258 college-graduate employees at three points over an 8-month period supported the proposed relationships. In addition, we found that ethical leadership buffered the effects of perceptions of being envied and ostracized on anger. These findings contribute to the literature by showing that perceptions of coworkers’ mistreatment can increase employees’ unethical judgment, but that managers’ ethical leadership is an important means of alleviating these effects.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademy of Management. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aomonline.org/aom.asp?id=156-
dc.relation.ispartofAcademy of Management Proceedings-
dc.relation.ispartof79th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, 2019-
dc.titleDoes Being Envied and Ostracized Make Employees Unethical?-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: tng@business.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088-
dc.identifier.doi10.5465/AMBPP.2019.10832abstract-
dc.identifier.hkuros307572-
dc.identifier.volume2019-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spageabstract no. 10832-
dc.identifier.epageabstract no. 10832-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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