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Article: Optogenetic fMRI interrogation of brain-wide central vestibular pathways

TitleOptogenetic fMRI interrogation of brain-wide central vestibular pathways
Authors
KeywordsfMRI
vestibular system
optogenetic
medial vestibular nucleus
vestibular functions
Issue Date2019
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2019, v. 116 n. 20, p. 10122-10129 How to Cite?
AbstractBlood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) constitutes a powerful neuroimaging technology to map brain-wide functions in response to specific sensory or cognitive tasks. However, fMRI mapping of the vestibular system, which is pivotal for our sense of balance, poses significant challenges. Physical constraints limit a subject’s ability to perform motion- and balance-related tasks inside the scanner, and current stimulation techniques within the scanner are nonspecific to delineate complex vestibular nucleus (VN) pathways. Using fMRI, we examined brain-wide neural activity patterns elicited by optogenetically stimulating excitatory neurons of a major vestibular nucleus, the ipsilateral medial VN (MVN). We demonstrated robust optogenetically evoked fMRI activations bilaterally at sensorimotor cortices and their associated thalamic nuclei (auditory, visual, somatosensory, and motor), high-order cortices (cingulate, retrosplenial, temporal association, and parietal), and hippocampal formations (dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and subiculum). We then examined the modulatory effects of the vestibular system on sensory processing using auditory and visual stimulation in combination with optogenetic excitation of the MVN. We found enhanced responses to sound in the auditory cortex, thalamus, and inferior colliculus ipsilateral to the stimulated MVN. In the visual pathway, we observed enhanced responses to visual stimuli in the ipsilateral visual cortex, thalamus, and contralateral superior colliculus. Taken together, our imaging findings reveal multiple brain-wide central vestibular pathways. We demonstrate large-scale modulatory effects of the vestibular system on sensory processing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279034
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 9.504
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeong, ATL-
dc.contributor.authorGu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChan, YS-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, H-
dc.contributor.authorDONG, CM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, RW-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorTan, LH-
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:18:25Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:18:25Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2019, v. 116 n. 20, p. 10122-10129-
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279034-
dc.description.abstractBlood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) constitutes a powerful neuroimaging technology to map brain-wide functions in response to specific sensory or cognitive tasks. However, fMRI mapping of the vestibular system, which is pivotal for our sense of balance, poses significant challenges. Physical constraints limit a subject’s ability to perform motion- and balance-related tasks inside the scanner, and current stimulation techniques within the scanner are nonspecific to delineate complex vestibular nucleus (VN) pathways. Using fMRI, we examined brain-wide neural activity patterns elicited by optogenetically stimulating excitatory neurons of a major vestibular nucleus, the ipsilateral medial VN (MVN). We demonstrated robust optogenetically evoked fMRI activations bilaterally at sensorimotor cortices and their associated thalamic nuclei (auditory, visual, somatosensory, and motor), high-order cortices (cingulate, retrosplenial, temporal association, and parietal), and hippocampal formations (dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and subiculum). We then examined the modulatory effects of the vestibular system on sensory processing using auditory and visual stimulation in combination with optogenetic excitation of the MVN. We found enhanced responses to sound in the auditory cortex, thalamus, and inferior colliculus ipsilateral to the stimulated MVN. In the visual pathway, we observed enhanced responses to visual stimuli in the ipsilateral visual cortex, thalamus, and contralateral superior colliculus. Taken together, our imaging findings reveal multiple brain-wide central vestibular pathways. We demonstrate large-scale modulatory effects of the vestibular system on sensory processing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences-
dc.rightsProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences.-
dc.subjectfMRI-
dc.subjectvestibular system-
dc.subjectoptogenetic-
dc.subjectmedial vestibular nucleus-
dc.subjectvestibular functions-
dc.titleOptogenetic fMRI interrogation of brain-wide central vestibular pathways-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeong, ATL: tlleong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, Y: loyalliu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWu, EX: ewu@eee.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeong, ATL=rp02483-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318-
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EX=rp00193-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1812453116-
dc.identifier.pmid31028140-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6525493-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85065730565-
dc.identifier.hkuros307645-
dc.identifier.volume116-
dc.identifier.issue20-
dc.identifier.spage10122-
dc.identifier.epage10129-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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