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Article: 3D Nanoprinting of Perovskites

Title3D Nanoprinting of Perovskites
Authors
Keywords3D printing
freestanding nanoarchitectures
organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites
perovskite nanowires
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley - VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/publish/en/journals/alphabeticIndex/2089
Citation
Advanced Materials, 2019, v. 31 n. 44, p. article no. 1904073 How to Cite?
AbstractAs competing with the established silicon technology, organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites are continually gaining ground in optoelectronics due to their excellent material properties and low‐cost production. The ability to have control over their shape, as well as composition and crystallinity, is indispensable for practical materialization. Many sophisticated nanofabrication methods have been devised to shape perovskites; however, they are still limited to in‐plane, low‐aspect‐ratio, and simple forms. This is in stark contrast with the demands of modern optoelectronics with freeform circuitry and high integration density. Here, a nanoprecision 3D printing is developed for organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites. The method is based on guiding evaporation‐induced perovskite crystallization in mid‐air using a femtoliter ink meniscus formed on a nanopipette, resulting in freestanding 3D perovskite nanostructures with a preferred crystal orientation. Stretching the ink meniscus with a pulling process enables on‐demand control of the nanostructure's diameter and hollowness, leading to an unprecedented tubular‐solid transition. With varying the pulling direction, a layer‐by‐layer stacking of perovskite nanostructures is successfully demonstrated with programmed shapes and positions, a primary step for additive manufacturing. It is expected that the method has the potential to create freeform perovskite nanostructures for customized optoelectronics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279180
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 21.95
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 9.021

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCHEN, M-
dc.contributor.authorYANG, J-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, Z-
dc.contributor.authorXU, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HK-
dc.contributor.authorLee, H-
dc.contributor.authorZHOU, Z-
dc.contributor.authorFeng, SPT-
dc.contributor.authorLee, SH-
dc.contributor.authorPyo, JY-
dc.contributor.authorSeol, SK-
dc.contributor.authorKi, D-
dc.contributor.authorKim, J-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:21:04Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAdvanced Materials, 2019, v. 31 n. 44, p. article no. 1904073-
dc.identifier.issn0935-9648-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279180-
dc.description.abstractAs competing with the established silicon technology, organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites are continually gaining ground in optoelectronics due to their excellent material properties and low‐cost production. The ability to have control over their shape, as well as composition and crystallinity, is indispensable for practical materialization. Many sophisticated nanofabrication methods have been devised to shape perovskites; however, they are still limited to in‐plane, low‐aspect‐ratio, and simple forms. This is in stark contrast with the demands of modern optoelectronics with freeform circuitry and high integration density. Here, a nanoprecision 3D printing is developed for organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites. The method is based on guiding evaporation‐induced perovskite crystallization in mid‐air using a femtoliter ink meniscus formed on a nanopipette, resulting in freestanding 3D perovskite nanostructures with a preferred crystal orientation. Stretching the ink meniscus with a pulling process enables on‐demand control of the nanostructure's diameter and hollowness, leading to an unprecedented tubular‐solid transition. With varying the pulling direction, a layer‐by‐layer stacking of perovskite nanostructures is successfully demonstrated with programmed shapes and positions, a primary step for additive manufacturing. It is expected that the method has the potential to create freeform perovskite nanostructures for customized optoelectronics.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley - VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley-vch.de/publish/en/journals/alphabeticIndex/2089-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvanced Materials-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subject3D printing-
dc.subjectfreestanding nanoarchitectures-
dc.subjectorganic–inorganic metal halide perovskites-
dc.subjectperovskite nanowires-
dc.title3D Nanoprinting of Perovskites-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, H: hslee611@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFeng, SPT: hpfeng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKi, D: dkki@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKim, J: jtkim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFeng, SPT=rp01533-
dc.identifier.authorityKi, D=rp02444-
dc.identifier.authorityKim, J=rp02152-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201904073-
dc.identifier.pmid31544295-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85073828676-
dc.identifier.hkuros307244-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue44-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1904073-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1904073-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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