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Article: Workplace violence and its aftermath in China’s health sector: implications from a cross-sectional survey across three tiers of the health system

TitleWorkplace violence and its aftermath in China’s health sector: implications from a cross-sectional survey across three tiers of the health system
Authors
KeywordsChina
health sector
impunity
workplace violence
Issue Date2019
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group: BMJ Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmjopen.bmj.com
Citation
BMJ Open, 2019, v. 9 n. 9, p. article no. e031513 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To determine the prevalence of physical violence and threats against health workers and the aftermath in tertiary, secondary and primary care facilities in China. Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting: 5 tertiary hospitals, 8 secondary hospitals and 32 primary care facilities located in both urban and rural areas of Zhejiang Province, China, were chosen as the study sites. Participants: A total of 4862 health workers who have contact with patients completed a survey from July 2016 to July 2017. Outcome measures: The prevalence of physical violence, threats and Yi Nao, specific forms of physical violence and their aftermath were measured by a self-designed and verified questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association between perceived organisational encouragement of reporting workplace violence (WPV) and physical violence, threats and Yi Nao after controlling for age, sex, level of facility, professional ranking and type of health worker. Results: Among all respondents, 224 (4.6%) were physically attacked and 848 (17.4%) experienced threats in the past year. Respondents in secondary hospitals were more likely to experience physical violence (AOR=3.29, 95% CI 2.21 to 4.89), threats (AOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) and Yi Nao (AOR=2.47, 95% CI 2.10 to 2.91), compared with primary care providers. Lack of organisational policies to report WPV was associated with higher likelihood of physical violence (AOR=3.64, 95% CI 2.57 to 5.18) and threats (AOR=2.21, 95% CI 1.76 to 2.78). Among physical violence cases, only 29.1% reported the attack to police mainly because most felt it useless to do so (58.8%). Only 25.7% were investigated and 72.4% of attackers received no punishment. Of all those attacked or threatened, 59.4% wanted to quit current post and 76.0% were fearful of dealing with urgent or severe cases. Conclusions: Proper management of the aftermath of violence against health workers is inadequate. Formal guidelines for reporting and managing WPV are urgently needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280947
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.496
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.448
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, SZ-
dc.contributor.authorWu, D-
dc.contributor.authorWang, N-
dc.contributor.authorHesketh, T-
dc.contributor.authorSun, KS-
dc.contributor.authorLi, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, X-D-
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T07:43:08Z-
dc.date.available2020-02-25T07:43:08Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Open, 2019, v. 9 n. 9, p. article no. e031513-
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280947-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine the prevalence of physical violence and threats against health workers and the aftermath in tertiary, secondary and primary care facilities in China. Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting: 5 tertiary hospitals, 8 secondary hospitals and 32 primary care facilities located in both urban and rural areas of Zhejiang Province, China, were chosen as the study sites. Participants: A total of 4862 health workers who have contact with patients completed a survey from July 2016 to July 2017. Outcome measures: The prevalence of physical violence, threats and Yi Nao, specific forms of physical violence and their aftermath were measured by a self-designed and verified questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association between perceived organisational encouragement of reporting workplace violence (WPV) and physical violence, threats and Yi Nao after controlling for age, sex, level of facility, professional ranking and type of health worker. Results: Among all respondents, 224 (4.6%) were physically attacked and 848 (17.4%) experienced threats in the past year. Respondents in secondary hospitals were more likely to experience physical violence (AOR=3.29, 95% CI 2.21 to 4.89), threats (AOR=1.61, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) and Yi Nao (AOR=2.47, 95% CI 2.10 to 2.91), compared with primary care providers. Lack of organisational policies to report WPV was associated with higher likelihood of physical violence (AOR=3.64, 95% CI 2.57 to 5.18) and threats (AOR=2.21, 95% CI 1.76 to 2.78). Among physical violence cases, only 29.1% reported the attack to police mainly because most felt it useless to do so (58.8%). Only 25.7% were investigated and 72.4% of attackers received no punishment. Of all those attacked or threatened, 59.4% wanted to quit current post and 76.0% were fearful of dealing with urgent or severe cases. Conclusions: Proper management of the aftermath of violence against health workers is inadequate. Formal guidelines for reporting and managing WPV are urgently needed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group: BMJ Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmjopen.bmj.com-
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Open-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjecthealth sector-
dc.subjectimpunity-
dc.subjectworkplace violence-
dc.titleWorkplace violence and its aftermath in China’s health sector: implications from a cross-sectional survey across three tiers of the health system-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSun, KS: kssun2@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031513-
dc.identifier.pmid31542763-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6756606-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072577221-
dc.identifier.hkuros309216-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e031513-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e031513-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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