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Article: Associations between demographic factors and psychological distress among Chinese residents in Hong Kong: beyond socioeconomic classes

TitleAssociations between demographic factors and psychological distress among Chinese residents in Hong Kong: beyond socioeconomic classes
Authors
KeywordsChinese
demographics
occupation
psychological distress
socioeconomic status
Issue Date2020
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13548506.asp
Citation
Psychology, Health & Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-01-15, p. 1-13 How to Cite?
AbstractMost studies highlighted the association between psychological distress and socioeconomic status (SES). There were weaker explanations for distress found in the middle classes, especially in Asian countries. We conducted a questionnaire survey with 1626 adult Chinese primary-care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics in different districts of Hong Kong. Their demographic background and distress level measured by GHQ-12 were analysed. We found that respondents with younger age, better education, and lower income were more likely to be distressed. In a multiple logistic regression model, age and income, but not education, were significant predictors for distress. Highest rates of distress were found among the unemployed (45.5%) and the students (37.1%), followed by service workers and shop sales workers (33.0%), associate professionals (32.0%), and clerks (29.2%). Craftworkers (9.1%), plant and machine operators (11.5%), and retired people (12.8%) were least likely to be distressed, followed by professionals (21.0%). Apart from SES, the findings suggest that young age, academic and job stressors, and low self-esteem are significant factors for distress. These factors may be intensified in a Chinese context by peer comparison resulting in a state of relative deprivation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280966
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.706
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.581

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, KS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KF-
dc.contributor.authorChan, HY-
dc.contributor.authorLo, TL-
dc.contributor.authorChao, DVK-
dc.contributor.authorYu, YTT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, EWW-
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T07:43:22Z-
dc.date.available2020-02-25T07:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationPsychology, Health & Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-01-15, p. 1-13-
dc.identifier.issn1354-8506-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280966-
dc.description.abstractMost studies highlighted the association between psychological distress and socioeconomic status (SES). There were weaker explanations for distress found in the middle classes, especially in Asian countries. We conducted a questionnaire survey with 1626 adult Chinese primary-care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics in different districts of Hong Kong. Their demographic background and distress level measured by GHQ-12 were analysed. We found that respondents with younger age, better education, and lower income were more likely to be distressed. In a multiple logistic regression model, age and income, but not education, were significant predictors for distress. Highest rates of distress were found among the unemployed (45.5%) and the students (37.1%), followed by service workers and shop sales workers (33.0%), associate professionals (32.0%), and clerks (29.2%). Craftworkers (9.1%), plant and machine operators (11.5%), and retired people (12.8%) were least likely to be distressed, followed by professionals (21.0%). Apart from SES, the findings suggest that young age, academic and job stressors, and low self-esteem are significant factors for distress. These factors may be intensified in a Chinese context by peer comparison resulting in a state of relative deprivation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13548506.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology, Health & Medicine-
dc.rightsPreprint: This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. Postprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI].-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectdemographics-
dc.subjectoccupation-
dc.subjectpsychological distress-
dc.subjectsocioeconomic status-
dc.titleAssociations between demographic factors and psychological distress among Chinese residents in Hong Kong: beyond socioeconomic classes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSun, KS: kssun2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, HY: step0826@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, TL: lotl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChao, DVK: dchku001@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYu, YTT: yytt0706@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, EWW: wwlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13548506.2020.1714063-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85078053965-
dc.identifier.hkuros309233-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-01-15-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage13-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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