File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Occupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust and alterations in immune/inflammatory markers: a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study in China

TitleOccupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust and alterations in immune/inflammatory markers: a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study in China
Authors
Keywordssmoking
inflammatory markers
lung
china
epidemiology
Issue Date2017
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Carcinogenesis, 2017, v. 38 n. 11, p. 1104-1111 How to Cite?
AbstractThe relationship between diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a known lung carcinogen, and immune/inflammatory markers that have been prospectively associated with lung cancer risk is not well understood. To provide insight into these associations, we conducted a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study of 54 males highly occupationally exposed to DEE and 55 unexposed male controls from representative workplaces in China. We measured plasma levels of 64 immune/inflammatory markers in all subjects using Luminex bead-based assays, and compared our findings to those from a nested case-control study of these markers and lung cancer risk, which had been conducted among never-smoking women in Shanghai using the same multiplex panels. Levels of nine markers that were associated with lung cancer risk in the Shanghai study were altered in DEE-exposed workers in the same direction as the lung cancer associations. Among these, associations with the levels of CRP (β= -0.53; P = 0.01) and CCL15/MIP-1D (β = 0.20; P = 0.02) were observed in workers exposed to DEE and with increasing elemental carbon exposure levels (Ptrends <0.05) in multivariable linear regression models. Levels of a third marker positively associated with an increased lung cancer risk, CCL2/MCP-1, were higher among DEE-exposed workers compared with controls in never and former smokers, but not in current smokers (Pinteraction = 0.01). The immunological differences in these markers in DEE-exposed workers are consistent with associations observed for lung cancer risk in a prospective study of Chinese women and may provide some insight into the mechanistic processes by which DEE causes lung cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281189
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 5.072
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.439
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBassig, A-
dc.contributor.authorDai, Y-
dc.contributor.authorVermeulen, R-
dc.contributor.authorRen, D-
dc.contributor.authorHu, W-
dc.contributor.authorDuan, H-
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorShiels, MS-
dc.contributor.authorKemp, TJ-
dc.contributor.authorPinto, LA-
dc.contributor.authorFu, W-
dc.contributor.authorMeliefste, K-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, B-
dc.contributor.authorYang, J-
dc.contributor.authorYe, M-
dc.contributor.authorJia, X-
dc.contributor.authorMeng, T-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYY-
dc.contributor.authorBin, P-
dc.contributor.authorHosgood, HD 3rd-
dc.contributor.authorHildesheim, A-
dc.contributor.authorSilverman, DT-
dc.contributor.authorRothman, N-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLan, Q-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T09:51:22Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-09T09:51:22Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationCarcinogenesis, 2017, v. 38 n. 11, p. 1104-1111-
dc.identifier.issn0143-3334-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281189-
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a known lung carcinogen, and immune/inflammatory markers that have been prospectively associated with lung cancer risk is not well understood. To provide insight into these associations, we conducted a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study of 54 males highly occupationally exposed to DEE and 55 unexposed male controls from representative workplaces in China. We measured plasma levels of 64 immune/inflammatory markers in all subjects using Luminex bead-based assays, and compared our findings to those from a nested case-control study of these markers and lung cancer risk, which had been conducted among never-smoking women in Shanghai using the same multiplex panels. Levels of nine markers that were associated with lung cancer risk in the Shanghai study were altered in DEE-exposed workers in the same direction as the lung cancer associations. Among these, associations with the levels of CRP (β= -0.53; P = 0.01) and CCL15/MIP-1D (β = 0.20; P = 0.02) were observed in workers exposed to DEE and with increasing elemental carbon exposure levels (Ptrends <0.05) in multivariable linear regression models. Levels of a third marker positively associated with an increased lung cancer risk, CCL2/MCP-1, were higher among DEE-exposed workers compared with controls in never and former smokers, but not in current smokers (Pinteraction = 0.01). The immunological differences in these markers in DEE-exposed workers are consistent with associations observed for lung cancer risk in a prospective study of Chinese women and may provide some insight into the mechanistic processes by which DEE causes lung cancer.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofCarcinogenesis-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectsmoking-
dc.subjectinflammatory markers-
dc.subjectlung-
dc.subjectchina-
dc.subjectepidemiology-
dc.titleOccupational exposure to diesel engine exhaust and alterations in immune/inflammatory markers: a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, J: xusunjun@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/carcin/bgx081-
dc.identifier.pmid28968774-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5862277-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85032729065-
dc.identifier.hkuros309322-
dc.identifier.volume38-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage1104-
dc.identifier.epage1111-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats