File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Distribution Channel Choice and Divisional Conflict in Remanufacturing Operations

TitleDistribution Channel Choice and Divisional Conflict in Remanufacturing Operations
Authors
Keywordsremanufacturing
product design and pricing
channel choice
divisional conflict
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1937-5956
Citation
Production and Operations Management, 2020, Epub 2020-04-08 How to Cite?
AbstractWe consider a firm consisting of two divisions, one responsible for designing and manufacturing new products and the other responsible for remanufacturing operations. The firm will sell these new and remanufactured products either directly to the consumer (direct selling) or through an independent retailer (indirect selling). Our study demonstrates that a firm’s organizational structure can affect its marketing decisions. Specifically, a decentralized firm with separate manufacturing and remanufacturing divisions can benefit from indirect selling with higher firm profit, supply chain profit, and total consumer demand than direct selling. Moreover, this structure also induces a remanufacturable product design. In contrast, a centralized firm in which the manufacturing and remanufacturing divisions are consolidated is intuitively better off by choosing direct selling than indirect selling. Furthermore, we show that, surprisingly, when the focal firm sells through an independent retailer, a decentralized internal structure can result in higher supply chain profit than a centralized internal structure. We further investigate the case of dual dedicated channels and conclude that, while direct selling of remanufactured products and indirect selling of new products can better induce a remanufacturable product design and higher supply chain profit, it is not in the best interest of the firm in terms of total sales and firm profit.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282836
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.59
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.367

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShi, T-
dc.contributor.authorChhajed, D-
dc.contributor.authorWan, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T06:22:09Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-05T06:22:09Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationProduction and Operations Management, 2020, Epub 2020-04-08-
dc.identifier.issn1059-1478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282836-
dc.description.abstractWe consider a firm consisting of two divisions, one responsible for designing and manufacturing new products and the other responsible for remanufacturing operations. The firm will sell these new and remanufactured products either directly to the consumer (direct selling) or through an independent retailer (indirect selling). Our study demonstrates that a firm’s organizational structure can affect its marketing decisions. Specifically, a decentralized firm with separate manufacturing and remanufacturing divisions can benefit from indirect selling with higher firm profit, supply chain profit, and total consumer demand than direct selling. Moreover, this structure also induces a remanufacturable product design. In contrast, a centralized firm in which the manufacturing and remanufacturing divisions are consolidated is intuitively better off by choosing direct selling than indirect selling. Furthermore, we show that, surprisingly, when the focal firm sells through an independent retailer, a decentralized internal structure can result in higher supply chain profit than a centralized internal structure. We further investigate the case of dual dedicated channels and conclude that, while direct selling of remanufactured products and indirect selling of new products can better induce a remanufacturable product design and higher supply chain profit, it is not in the best interest of the firm in terms of total sales and firm profit.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1937-5956-
dc.relation.ispartofProduction and Operations Management-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectremanufacturing-
dc.subjectproduct design and pricing-
dc.subjectchannel choice-
dc.subjectdivisional conflict-
dc.titleDistribution Channel Choice and Divisional Conflict in Remanufacturing Operations-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWan, Z: zhixiwan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWan, Z=rp02634-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/poms.13185-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85085151822-
dc.identifier.hkuros310019-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-04-08-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats