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Article: Comparative replication and immune activation profiles of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV in human lungs: an ex vivo study with implications for the pathogenesis of COVID-19

TitleComparative replication and immune activation profiles of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV in human lungs: an ex vivo study with implications for the pathogenesis of COVID-19
Authors
Keywordscoronavirus
COVID-19
ex vivo
interferon
SARS-CoV-2
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2020, Epub 2020-04-09 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an emerging coronavirus that has resulted in more than 2 000 000 laboratory-confirmed cases including over 145 000 deaths. Although SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV share a number of common clinical manifestations, SARS-CoV-2 appears to be highly efficient in person-to-person transmission and frequently causes asymptomatic or presymptomatic infections. However, the underlying mechanisms that confer these viral characteristics of high transmissibility and asymptomatic infection remain incompletely understood. Methods: We comprehensively investigated the replication, cell tropism, and immune activation profile of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung tissues with SARS-CoV included as a comparison. Results: SARS-CoV-2 infected and replicated in human lung tissues more efficiently than SARS-CoV. Within the 48-hour interval, SARS-CoV-2 generated 3.20-fold more infectious virus particles than did SARS-CoV from the infected lung tissues (P < .024). SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV were similar in cell tropism, with both targeting types I and II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages. Importantly, despite the more efficient virus replication, SARS-CoV-2 did not significantly induce types I, II, or III interferons in the infected human lung tissues. In addition, while SARS-CoV infection upregulated the expression of 11 out of 13 (84.62%) representative proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines, SARS-CoV-2 infection only upregulated 5 of these 13 (38.46%) key inflammatory mediators despite replicating more efficiently. Conclusions: Our study provides the first quantitative data on the comparative replication capacity and immune activation profile of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection in human lung tissues. Our results provide important insights into the pathogenesis, high transmissibility, and asymptomatic infection of SARS-CoV-2.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/283265
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 8.313
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, H-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, TTT-
dc.contributor.authorChai, Y-
dc.contributor.authorHou, Y-
dc.contributor.authorShuai, H-
dc.contributor.authorYang, D-
dc.contributor.authorHu, B-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X-
dc.contributor.authorCai, JP-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J-
dc.contributor.authorYuan, S-
dc.contributor.authorKok, KH-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, IHY-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, AJ-
dc.contributor.authorSit, KY-
dc.contributor.authorAu, WK-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T02:54:19Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-22T02:54:19Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 2020, Epub 2020-04-09-
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/283265-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an emerging coronavirus that has resulted in more than 2 000 000 laboratory-confirmed cases including over 145 000 deaths. Although SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV share a number of common clinical manifestations, SARS-CoV-2 appears to be highly efficient in person-to-person transmission and frequently causes asymptomatic or presymptomatic infections. However, the underlying mechanisms that confer these viral characteristics of high transmissibility and asymptomatic infection remain incompletely understood. Methods: We comprehensively investigated the replication, cell tropism, and immune activation profile of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lung tissues with SARS-CoV included as a comparison. Results: SARS-CoV-2 infected and replicated in human lung tissues more efficiently than SARS-CoV. Within the 48-hour interval, SARS-CoV-2 generated 3.20-fold more infectious virus particles than did SARS-CoV from the infected lung tissues (P < .024). SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV were similar in cell tropism, with both targeting types I and II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages. Importantly, despite the more efficient virus replication, SARS-CoV-2 did not significantly induce types I, II, or III interferons in the infected human lung tissues. In addition, while SARS-CoV infection upregulated the expression of 11 out of 13 (84.62%) representative proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines, SARS-CoV-2 infection only upregulated 5 of these 13 (38.46%) key inflammatory mediators despite replicating more efficiently. Conclusions: Our study provides the first quantitative data on the comparative replication capacity and immune activation profile of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection in human lung tissues. Our results provide important insights into the pathogenesis, high transmissibility, and asymptomatic infection of SARS-CoV-2.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectcoronavirus-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectex vivo-
dc.subjectinterferon-
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2-
dc.titleComparative replication and immune activation profiles of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV in human lungs: an ex vivo study with implications for the pathogenesis of COVID-19-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChu, H: hinchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChai, Y: chaiyue@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShuai, H: shuaihp@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHu, B: bingjie@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCai, JP: caijuice@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhou, J: jiezhou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuan, S: yuansf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKok, KH: khkok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, IHY: ivyhchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, AJ: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailAu, WK: auwkt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, H=rp02125-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736-
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, J=rp01412-
dc.identifier.authorityYuan, S=rp02640-
dc.identifier.authorityKok, KH=rp01455-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, AJ=rp00413-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciaa410-
dc.identifier.pmid32270184-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7184390-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083118916-
dc.identifier.hkuros310485-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-04-09-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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