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Article: Hypoxia Causes Transgenerational Impairment of Ovarian Development and Hatching Success in Fish

TitleHypoxia Causes Transgenerational Impairment of Ovarian Development and Hatching Success in Fish
Authors
KeywordsHypoxia
Cell signaling
Peptides and proteins
Genetics
Monomers
Issue Date2019
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/esthag
Citation
Environmental Science & Technology, 2019, v. 53 n. 7, p. 3917-3928 How to Cite?
AbstractHypoxia is a pressing environmental problem in both marine and freshwater ecosystems globally, and this problem will be further exacerbated by global warming in the coming decades. Recently, we reported that hypoxia can cause transgenerational impairment of sperm quality and quantity in fish (in F0, F1, and F2 generations) through DNA methylome modifications. Here, we provide evidence that female fish (Oryzias melastigma) exposed to hypoxia exhibit reproductive impairments (follicle atresia and retarded oocyte development), leading to a drastic reduction in hatching success in the F2 generation of the transgenerational group, although they have never been exposed to hypoxia. Further analyses show that the observed transgenerational impairments in ovarian functions are related to changes in the DNA methylation and expression pattern of two gene clusters that are closely associated with stress-induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. The observed epigenetic and transgenerational alterations suggest that hypoxia may pose a significant threat to the sustainability of natural fish populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284629
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 7.864
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.664

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, KP-
dc.contributor.authorWang, SY-
dc.contributor.authorLi, JW-
dc.contributor.authorTong, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChan, TF-
dc.contributor.authorJin, N-
dc.contributor.authorTse, A-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JW-
dc.contributor.authorWan, MT-
dc.contributor.authorTam, N-
dc.contributor.authorAu, DWT-
dc.contributor.authorLee, BY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JS-
dc.contributor.authorWong, AST-
dc.contributor.authorKong, RYC-
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSS-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:00:23Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:00:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science & Technology, 2019, v. 53 n. 7, p. 3917-3928-
dc.identifier.issn0013-936X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284629-
dc.description.abstractHypoxia is a pressing environmental problem in both marine and freshwater ecosystems globally, and this problem will be further exacerbated by global warming in the coming decades. Recently, we reported that hypoxia can cause transgenerational impairment of sperm quality and quantity in fish (in F0, F1, and F2 generations) through DNA methylome modifications. Here, we provide evidence that female fish (Oryzias melastigma) exposed to hypoxia exhibit reproductive impairments (follicle atresia and retarded oocyte development), leading to a drastic reduction in hatching success in the F2 generation of the transgenerational group, although they have never been exposed to hypoxia. Further analyses show that the observed transgenerational impairments in ovarian functions are related to changes in the DNA methylation and expression pattern of two gene clusters that are closely associated with stress-induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. The observed epigenetic and transgenerational alterations suggest that hypoxia may pose a significant threat to the sustainability of natural fish populations.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/esthag-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science & Technology-
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in [JournalTitle], copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see [insert ACS Articles on Request author-directed link to Published Work, see http://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/articlesonrequest/index.html].-
dc.subjectHypoxia-
dc.subjectCell signaling-
dc.subjectPeptides and proteins-
dc.subjectGenetics-
dc.subjectMonomers-
dc.titleHypoxia Causes Transgenerational Impairment of Ovarian Development and Hatching Success in Fish-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTong, Y: tongyin9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, JW: jzhang1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, AST: awong1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, JW=rp01713-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AST=rp00805-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.est.8b07250-
dc.identifier.pmid30844260-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85063367136-
dc.identifier.hkuros312371-
dc.identifier.volume53-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage3917-
dc.identifier.epage3928-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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