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Article: A Sound and Fury Signifying Mediatisation: On The Hong Kong Protests, 2019

TitleA Sound and Fury Signifying Mediatisation: On The Hong Kong Protests, 2019
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
anti-extradition protests
mediatisation
global media
China
Issue Date2020
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjav20/current
Citation
Javnost, 2020, v. 27 n. 2, p. 200-209 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the massive protests and global media event known as the “anti-extradition protests” in Hong Kong during 2019. The protests became the most live-streamed movement ever, and were narrated globally, though not in China, as an exemplary, brave demand for democracy and freedom against the P.R.C.'s intrusions. I argue that the event and movement can also be read as an apt example of mediatisation, or the media direction if not command of the geo-political sphere. From one perspective the movement was a spectacular success in garnering media sympathy and attention, even generating American legislation in support of Hong Kong's “freedom.” And yet the mainland's refusal to intervene into or pacify the conflict, despite deliberate, extreme provocations to make it do so, also suggest strong limits to global mediatisation. The movement may have triggered a new approach for Chinese resistance to mediatisation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285008
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.024
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.356

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVukovich, D-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:05:32Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:05:32Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJavnost, 2020, v. 27 n. 2, p. 200-209-
dc.identifier.issn1318-3222-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285008-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the massive protests and global media event known as the “anti-extradition protests” in Hong Kong during 2019. The protests became the most live-streamed movement ever, and were narrated globally, though not in China, as an exemplary, brave demand for democracy and freedom against the P.R.C.'s intrusions. I argue that the event and movement can also be read as an apt example of mediatisation, or the media direction if not command of the geo-political sphere. From one perspective the movement was a spectacular success in garnering media sympathy and attention, even generating American legislation in support of Hong Kong's “freedom.” And yet the mainland's refusal to intervene into or pacify the conflict, despite deliberate, extreme provocations to make it do so, also suggest strong limits to global mediatisation. The movement may have triggered a new approach for Chinese resistance to mediatisation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjav20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofJavnost-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectanti-extradition protests-
dc.subjectmediatisation-
dc.subjectglobal media-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleA Sound and Fury Signifying Mediatisation: On The Hong Kong Protests, 2019-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailVukovich, D: vukovich@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityVukovich, D=rp01178-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13183222.2020.1727278-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85084343113-
dc.identifier.hkuros312382-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage200-
dc.identifier.epage209-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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