File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Platinum(II) Probes for Sensing Polyelectrolyte Lengths and Architectures

TitlePlatinum(II) Probes for Sensing Polyelectrolyte Lengths and Architectures
Authors
Keywordsaggregation
DNA
intercalation
metal−metal interaction
platinum
Issue Date2020
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/aamick
Citation
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2020, v. 12 n. 7, p. 8503-8512 How to Cite?
AbstractPlatinum(II) polypyridine complexes of a square-planar geometry have been used as spectroscopic reporters for quantification of various charged species through non-covalent metal–metal interactions. The characterization of molecular weights and architectures of polyelectrolytes represents a challenging task in polymer science. Here, we report the utilization of platinum(II) complex probes and non-covalent metal–metal interactions for sensing polyelectrolyte lengths and architectures. It is found that the platinum(II) probes can bind to linear polyelectrolytes via electrostatic attractions and give rise to significant spectroscopic changes associated with the formation of metal–metal interactions, and the extent of the spectroscopic changes is found to increase with the lengths of the linear polyelectrolytes. Besides, the platinum(II) probes have been found to co-assemble with the linear polyelectrolytes to form well-defined nanofibers, and the lengths of the linear polyelectrolytes can be directly estimated from the diameter of the nanofibers under transmission electron microscopy observation. Interestingly, upon mixing with the platinum(II) probes, polyelectrolytes with bottlebrush architectures have been found to exhibit larger spectroscopic changes than linear polyelectrolytes with the same chemical composition. Combined with the reported theoretical studies on counterion condensation of polyelectrolytes, the platinum(II) complexes are found to function as spectroscopic probes for sensing the charge densities of the polyelectrolytes with different lengths and diverse architectures. Moreover, platinum(II) probes pre-organized in nanostructured aggregates have been found to intercalate into double-stranded DNA, which are naturally occurring biological polyelectrolytes with helical architectures and intercalation sites, to give significant enhancement of spectroscopic changes when compared to the intercalation of monomeric platinum(II) probes into double-stranded DNA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285236
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 8.758
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.381

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, K-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, MCL-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SYL-
dc.contributor.authorYam, VWW-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T03:51:32Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-18T03:51:32Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2020, v. 12 n. 7, p. 8503-8512-
dc.identifier.issn1944-8244-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285236-
dc.description.abstractPlatinum(II) polypyridine complexes of a square-planar geometry have been used as spectroscopic reporters for quantification of various charged species through non-covalent metal–metal interactions. The characterization of molecular weights and architectures of polyelectrolytes represents a challenging task in polymer science. Here, we report the utilization of platinum(II) complex probes and non-covalent metal–metal interactions for sensing polyelectrolyte lengths and architectures. It is found that the platinum(II) probes can bind to linear polyelectrolytes via electrostatic attractions and give rise to significant spectroscopic changes associated with the formation of metal–metal interactions, and the extent of the spectroscopic changes is found to increase with the lengths of the linear polyelectrolytes. Besides, the platinum(II) probes have been found to co-assemble with the linear polyelectrolytes to form well-defined nanofibers, and the lengths of the linear polyelectrolytes can be directly estimated from the diameter of the nanofibers under transmission electron microscopy observation. Interestingly, upon mixing with the platinum(II) probes, polyelectrolytes with bottlebrush architectures have been found to exhibit larger spectroscopic changes than linear polyelectrolytes with the same chemical composition. Combined with the reported theoretical studies on counterion condensation of polyelectrolytes, the platinum(II) complexes are found to function as spectroscopic probes for sensing the charge densities of the polyelectrolytes with different lengths and diverse architectures. Moreover, platinum(II) probes pre-organized in nanostructured aggregates have been found to intercalate into double-stranded DNA, which are naturally occurring biological polyelectrolytes with helical architectures and intercalation sites, to give significant enhancement of spectroscopic changes when compared to the intercalation of monomeric platinum(II) probes into double-stranded DNA.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/aamick-
dc.relation.ispartofACS Applied Materials & Interfaces-
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in [JournalTitle], copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see [insert ACS Articles on Request author-directed link to Published Work, see http://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/articlesonrequest/index.html].-
dc.subjectaggregation-
dc.subjectDNA-
dc.subjectintercalation-
dc.subjectmetal−metal interaction-
dc.subjectplatinum-
dc.titlePlatinum(II) Probes for Sensing Polyelectrolyte Lengths and Architectures-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYam, VWW: wwyam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYam, VWW=rp00822-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acsami.9b17611-
dc.identifier.pmid32027479-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85079669240-
dc.identifier.hkuros313052-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage8503-
dc.identifier.epage8512-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats