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Article: Cerebellar neural markers of susceptibility to social isolation and positive affective processing

TitleCerebellar neural markers of susceptibility to social isolation and positive affective processing
Authors
KeywordsLoneliness
Social network
Cerebellum
Voxel-based morphometry
FMRI
Psycho-physiological interaction
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00429/index.htm
Citation
Brain Structure and Function, 2019, v. 224 n. 9, p. 3339-3351 How to Cite?
AbstractChronic loneliness predicts mood disturbances and onset of major depressive disorder. However, little research has examined the neural correlates of individual difference in susceptibility to perceiving loneliness. In addition, the role of cerebellum, which is heavily implicated in social, cognitive and affective processes, in loneliness is unclear. We studied 99 healthy individuals divided into susceptible, concordant and robust groups depending on whether the participant’s loneliness level was greater, comparable or less than her/his objective social isolation level. The cerebellar gray matter structure, functional activity and connectivity patterns during performing an emotion stroop task were examined. We found greater posterior and medial cerebellar volume in the susceptible group than the other groups. In addition, the posterior and medial cerebellar activities when processing positive versus neutral words exhibited significant interactive effects of both loneliness and social network, and susceptibility to isolation. Loneliness and social network also had positive effects on the right posterior cerebellar functional connectivity with the visual and premotor cortices. Our findings provide novel evidence on the intricate role of the cerebellum in loneliness and susceptibility to isolation, suggesting that socio-cognitive processes of the cerebellum in the hedonic domain may be a key mechanism underlying loneliness proneness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286117
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.298
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.035
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, NML-
dc.contributor.authorShao, R-
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorTao, J-
dc.contributor.authorChen, L-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T06:59:21Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-31T06:59:21Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBrain Structure and Function, 2019, v. 224 n. 9, p. 3339-3351-
dc.identifier.issn1863-2653-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286117-
dc.description.abstractChronic loneliness predicts mood disturbances and onset of major depressive disorder. However, little research has examined the neural correlates of individual difference in susceptibility to perceiving loneliness. In addition, the role of cerebellum, which is heavily implicated in social, cognitive and affective processes, in loneliness is unclear. We studied 99 healthy individuals divided into susceptible, concordant and robust groups depending on whether the participant’s loneliness level was greater, comparable or less than her/his objective social isolation level. The cerebellar gray matter structure, functional activity and connectivity patterns during performing an emotion stroop task were examined. We found greater posterior and medial cerebellar volume in the susceptible group than the other groups. In addition, the posterior and medial cerebellar activities when processing positive versus neutral words exhibited significant interactive effects of both loneliness and social network, and susceptibility to isolation. Loneliness and social network also had positive effects on the right posterior cerebellar functional connectivity with the visual and premotor cortices. Our findings provide novel evidence on the intricate role of the cerebellum in loneliness and susceptibility to isolation, suggesting that socio-cognitive processes of the cerebellum in the hedonic domain may be a key mechanism underlying loneliness proneness.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00429/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Structure and Function-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectLoneliness-
dc.subjectSocial network-
dc.subjectCerebellum-
dc.subjectVoxel-based morphometry-
dc.subjectFMRI-
dc.subjectPsycho-physiological interaction-
dc.titleCerebellar neural markers of susceptibility to social isolation and positive affective processing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShao, R: rshao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityShao, R=rp02519-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00429-019-01965-y-
dc.identifier.pmid31701265-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6875157-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85074837834-
dc.identifier.hkuros313762-
dc.identifier.volume224-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage3339-
dc.identifier.epage3351-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000495396500001-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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