File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Cryogenic 3D Printing of Porous Scaffolds for in situ Delivery of 2D Black Phosphorus Nanosheets, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Osteogenic Peptide for Treating Tumor Resection-induced Bone Defects

TitleCryogenic 3D Printing of Porous Scaffolds for in situ Delivery of 2D Black Phosphorus Nanosheets, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Osteogenic Peptide for Treating Tumor Resection-induced Bone Defects
Authors
KeywordsBlack phosphorus nanosheets
Bone regeneration
Cancer recurrence
Cryogenic 3D printing
Doxorubicin hydrochloride
Osteogenic peptide
Issue Date2020
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/bf
Citation
Biofabrication, 2020, v. 12 n. 3, article no. 035004 How to Cite?
AbstractTumor resection is widely used to prevent tumor growth. However, the defected tissue at the original tumor site also causes tissue or organ dysfunction which lowers the patient's life quality. Therefore, regenerating the tissue and preventing tumor recurrence are highly important. Herein, according to the concept of 'first kill and then regenerate', a versatile scaffold-based tissue engineering strategy based on cryogenic 3D printing of water-in-oil polyester emulsion inks, containing multiple functional agents, was developed, in order to realize the elimination of tumor cells with recurrence suppression and improved tissue regeneration sequentially. To illustrate our strategy, water/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/dichloromethane emulsions containing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), 2D black phosphorus (BP) nanosheets, low-dose doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and high-dose osteogenic peptide were cryogenically 3D printed into hierarchically porous and mechanically strong nanocomposite scaffolds, with multiple functions to treat bone tumor, resection-induced tissue defects. Prompt tumor ablation and long-term suppression of tumor recurrence could be achieved due to the synergistic effects of photothermotherapy and chemotherapy, and improved bone regeneration was obtained eventually due to the presence of bony environment and sustained peptide release. Notably, BP nanosheets in scaffolds significantly reduced the long-term toxicity phenomenon of released DOX during in vivo bone regeneration. Our study also provides insights for the design of multi-functional tissue engineering scaffolds for treating other tumor resection-induced tissue defects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286233
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 8.213
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.505

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, C-
dc.contributor.authorYe, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorBai, L-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Z-
dc.contributor.authorTong, Q-
dc.contributor.authorXie, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H-
dc.contributor.authorCai, D-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLu, B-
dc.contributor.authorWei, Y-
dc.contributor.authorMei, L-
dc.contributor.authorXie, D-
dc.contributor.authorWang, M-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T07:01:02Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-31T07:01:02Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBiofabrication, 2020, v. 12 n. 3, article no. 035004-
dc.identifier.issn1758-5082-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/286233-
dc.description.abstractTumor resection is widely used to prevent tumor growth. However, the defected tissue at the original tumor site also causes tissue or organ dysfunction which lowers the patient's life quality. Therefore, regenerating the tissue and preventing tumor recurrence are highly important. Herein, according to the concept of 'first kill and then regenerate', a versatile scaffold-based tissue engineering strategy based on cryogenic 3D printing of water-in-oil polyester emulsion inks, containing multiple functional agents, was developed, in order to realize the elimination of tumor cells with recurrence suppression and improved tissue regeneration sequentially. To illustrate our strategy, water/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/dichloromethane emulsions containing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), 2D black phosphorus (BP) nanosheets, low-dose doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and high-dose osteogenic peptide were cryogenically 3D printed into hierarchically porous and mechanically strong nanocomposite scaffolds, with multiple functions to treat bone tumor, resection-induced tissue defects. Prompt tumor ablation and long-term suppression of tumor recurrence could be achieved due to the synergistic effects of photothermotherapy and chemotherapy, and improved bone regeneration was obtained eventually due to the presence of bony environment and sustained peptide release. Notably, BP nanosheets in scaffolds significantly reduced the long-term toxicity phenomenon of released DOX during in vivo bone regeneration. Our study also provides insights for the design of multi-functional tissue engineering scaffolds for treating other tumor resection-induced tissue defects.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/bf-
dc.relation.ispartofBiofabrication-
dc.subjectBlack phosphorus nanosheets-
dc.subjectBone regeneration-
dc.subjectCancer recurrence-
dc.subjectCryogenic 3D printing-
dc.subjectDoxorubicin hydrochloride-
dc.subjectOsteogenic peptide-
dc.titleCryogenic 3D Printing of Porous Scaffolds for in situ Delivery of 2D Black Phosphorus Nanosheets, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Osteogenic Peptide for Treating Tumor Resection-induced Bone Defects-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, M: memwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00185-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1758-5090/ab6d35-
dc.identifier.pmid31952065-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083536353-
dc.identifier.hkuros313807-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 035004-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 035004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats