File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Legal Uncertainty—The Gray Area around Substandard Medicines: Where Public Health Meets Law

TitleLegal Uncertainty—The Gray Area around Substandard Medicines: Where Public Health Meets Law
Authors
Keywordscrime
government regulation
health care policy
human
law
Issue Date2020
PublisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajtmh.org/
Citation
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2020, v. 102 n. 2, p. 262-267 How to Cite?
AbstractThe WHO estimates that on average, 10.5% of the medicines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are of poor quality,1 failing to meet standards for amounts of active ingredients(s), impurities, bioavailability, sterility, stability, packaging, etc.2,3 They threaten the welfare of individuals and societies, undermine health systems, and challenge the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC), which requires equitable access to quality-assured medicines.4–6 Collectively, poor-quality medicines are now called “substandard and falsified (SF)” medical products (Table 1) as per a 2017 World Health Assembly (WHA) resolution.7 “Falsified” implies intent of deceiving, whereas “substandard” medicines are authorized, but noncompliant with quality standards. This is a welcomed improvement over the previous complex and disputed “working definition” of “substandard/spurious/falsely-labelled/falsified/counterfeit medical products,” as it squarely focuses on public health. It now needs to be translated into action in countries to prevent, correct, compensate for, and, where necessary, sanction wrongdoings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/288092
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.126
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOlliaro, E-
dc.contributor.authorOlliaro, P-
dc.contributor.authorHo, CWL-
dc.contributor.authorRavinetto, R-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:07:45Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:07:45Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2020, v. 102 n. 2, p. 262-267-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9637-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/288092-
dc.description.abstractThe WHO estimates that on average, 10.5% of the medicines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are of poor quality,1 failing to meet standards for amounts of active ingredients(s), impurities, bioavailability, sterility, stability, packaging, etc.2,3 They threaten the welfare of individuals and societies, undermine health systems, and challenge the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC), which requires equitable access to quality-assured medicines.4–6 Collectively, poor-quality medicines are now called “substandard and falsified (SF)” medical products (Table 1) as per a 2017 World Health Assembly (WHA) resolution.7 “Falsified” implies intent of deceiving, whereas “substandard” medicines are authorized, but noncompliant with quality standards. This is a welcomed improvement over the previous complex and disputed “working definition” of “substandard/spurious/falsely-labelled/falsified/counterfeit medical products,” as it squarely focuses on public health. It now needs to be translated into action in countries to prevent, correct, compensate for, and, where necessary, sanction wrongdoings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajtmh.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene-
dc.rightsThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Copyright © American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectcrime-
dc.subjectgovernment regulation-
dc.subjecthealth care policy-
dc.subjecthuman-
dc.subjectlaw-
dc.titleLegal Uncertainty—The Gray Area around Substandard Medicines: Where Public Health Meets Law-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, CWL: cwlho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CWL=rp02632-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.4269/ajtmh.19-0645-
dc.identifier.pmid31746313-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7008313-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85079076246-
dc.identifier.hkuros315212-
dc.identifier.volume102-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage262-
dc.identifier.epage267-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats