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Article: A study on mechanical properties and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble with the flat‐jointed model

TitleA study on mechanical properties and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble with the flat‐jointed model
Authors
Keywordsflat‐jointed model
grain boundary crack
transgranular crack
tensile fracture
shear fracture marble
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3312
Citation
International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics, 2020, v. 44 n. 6, p. 803-822 How to Cite?
AbstractOvercoming two inherent limitations presented by the standard bonded‐particle model (BPM), the flat‐jointed model still lacks extensive application. This study hereby conducts a comprehensive investigation on the application of the flat‐jointed model in rock mechanics study. First, after a careful examination on the mechanical behavior of the flat‐joint contact, a systematic calibration has been conducted to build numerical models matching the mechanical properties of Carrara marble. Second, the validated model is used to simulate the fracturing behavior of marble specimens containing a single or en‐echelon flaws. Finally, the appearance of particle flow code (PFC) models has been compared with the results obtained from optical observation in order to establish a possible correlation between PFC models and real marble regarding microcracking behavior. Discussions suggest that to remove the particle size effect, the model resolution (ratio of sample dimension to the average particle diameter) should be larger than 30 in the flat‐jointed model and 150 in the BPM, respectively. Results from the above investigations suggest that the flat‐jointed model is capable of matching both the mechanical properties and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble. The numerical model is more reliable to predict the fracturing path at the instant of initiation than at failure. Development of initial fractures is not only controlled by the magnitude of tension force but also influenced by the extent of distribution of tension force. The appearance and components of a fracture in flat‐jointed models probably reveal not only its property (tensile or shear) but also the corresponding microcracking behavior of real rocks.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290559
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.676

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWong, LNY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T05:43:58Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-02T05:43:58Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics, 2020, v. 44 n. 6, p. 803-822-
dc.identifier.issn0363-9061-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290559-
dc.description.abstractOvercoming two inherent limitations presented by the standard bonded‐particle model (BPM), the flat‐jointed model still lacks extensive application. This study hereby conducts a comprehensive investigation on the application of the flat‐jointed model in rock mechanics study. First, after a careful examination on the mechanical behavior of the flat‐joint contact, a systematic calibration has been conducted to build numerical models matching the mechanical properties of Carrara marble. Second, the validated model is used to simulate the fracturing behavior of marble specimens containing a single or en‐echelon flaws. Finally, the appearance of particle flow code (PFC) models has been compared with the results obtained from optical observation in order to establish a possible correlation between PFC models and real marble regarding microcracking behavior. Discussions suggest that to remove the particle size effect, the model resolution (ratio of sample dimension to the average particle diameter) should be larger than 30 in the flat‐jointed model and 150 in the BPM, respectively. Results from the above investigations suggest that the flat‐jointed model is capable of matching both the mechanical properties and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble. The numerical model is more reliable to predict the fracturing path at the instant of initiation than at failure. Development of initial fractures is not only controlled by the magnitude of tension force but also influenced by the extent of distribution of tension force. The appearance and components of a fracture in flat‐jointed models probably reveal not only its property (tensile or shear) but also the corresponding microcracking behavior of real rocks.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/3312-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectflat‐jointed model-
dc.subjectgrain boundary crack-
dc.subjecttransgranular crack-
dc.subjecttensile fracture-
dc.subjectshear fracture marble-
dc.titleA study on mechanical properties and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble with the flat‐jointed model-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, LNY: lnywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, LNY=rp02069-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/nag.3040-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85078807726-
dc.identifier.hkuros317669-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage803-
dc.identifier.epage822-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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