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Article: Serological evidence of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

TitleSerological evidence of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors
Keywordsinfluenza in humans
influenza A (H7N9)
erological evidence
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2020, Epub 2020-10-29 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The extent of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, including mild and asymptomatic infections, is uncertain. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of serosurveys for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infections in humans published during 2013–2020. Three seropositive definitions were assessed to estimate pooled seroprevalence, seroconversion rate, and seroincidence by types of exposures. We applied a scoring system to assess the quality of included studies. Results: Of 31 included studies, pooled seroprevalence of A(H7N9) virus antibodies from all participants was 0.02%, with poultry workers, close contacts, and general populations having seroprevalence of 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.02%, respectively, based on the World Health Organization (WHO)—recommended definition. Although most infections were asymptomatic, evidence of infection was highest in poultry workers (5% seroconversion, 19.1% seroincidence per 100 person-years). Use of different virus clades did not significantly affect seroprevalence estimates. Most serological studies were of low to moderate quality and did not follow standardized seroepidemiological protocols or WHO-recommended laboratory methods. Conclusions: Human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus have been uncommon, especially for general populations. Workers with occupational exposures to poultry and close contacts of A(H7N9) human cases had low risks of infection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/291149
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.226
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.690

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, W-
dc.contributor.authorChen, X-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLai, S-
dc.contributor.authorYang, J-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorHorby, PW-
dc.contributor.authorUyeki, TM-
dc.contributor.authorYu, H-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-07T13:52:51Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-07T13:52:51Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2020, Epub 2020-10-29-
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/291149-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The extent of human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, including mild and asymptomatic infections, is uncertain. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of serosurveys for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infections in humans published during 2013–2020. Three seropositive definitions were assessed to estimate pooled seroprevalence, seroconversion rate, and seroincidence by types of exposures. We applied a scoring system to assess the quality of included studies. Results: Of 31 included studies, pooled seroprevalence of A(H7N9) virus antibodies from all participants was 0.02%, with poultry workers, close contacts, and general populations having seroprevalence of 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.02%, respectively, based on the World Health Organization (WHO)—recommended definition. Although most infections were asymptomatic, evidence of infection was highest in poultry workers (5% seroconversion, 19.1% seroincidence per 100 person-years). Use of different virus clades did not significantly affect seroprevalence estimates. Most serological studies were of low to moderate quality and did not follow standardized seroepidemiological protocols or WHO-recommended laboratory methods. Conclusions: Human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus have been uncommon, especially for general populations. Workers with occupational exposures to poultry and close contacts of A(H7N9) human cases had low risks of infection.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of Infectious Diseases-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectinfluenza in humans-
dc.subjectinfluenza A (H7N9)-
dc.subjecterological evidence-
dc.titleSerological evidence of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: a systematic review and meta-analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiaa679-
dc.identifier.pmid33119755-
dc.identifier.hkuros318661-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-10-29-
dc.identifier.spage679-
dc.identifier.epage679-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0022-1899-

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