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Article: Blood lead level and risk of hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2016

TitleBlood lead level and risk of hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2016
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2021, v. 11, p. article no. 3010 How to Cite?
AbstractLead is a heavy metal without a biological role. High level of lead exposure is known to be associated with hypertension, but the risk at low levels of exposure is uncertain. In this study, data from US NHANES 1999–2016 were analyzed. Adults with blood lead and blood pressure measurements, or self-reported hypertension diagnosis, were included. If not already diagnosed, hypertension was defined according to the AHA/ACC 2017 hypertension guideline. Results were analyzed using R statistics version 3.5.1 with sample weight adjustment. Logistic regression was used to study the association between blood lead level and hypertension. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated. Altogether, 39,477 participants were included. Every doubling in blood lead level was associated with hypertension (OR [95%CI] 1.45 [1.40–1.50]), which remained significant after adjusting for demographics. Using quartile 1 as reference, higher blood lead levels were associated with increased adjusted odds of hypertension (Quartile 4 vs. Quartile 1: 1.22 [1.09–1.36]; Quartile 3 vs. Quartile 1: 1.15 [1.04–1.28]; Quartile 2 vs. Quartile 1: 1.14 [1.05–1.25]). In conclusion, blood lead level is associated with hypertension in the general population with blood lead levels below 5 µg/dL. Our findings suggest that reducing present levels of environmental lead exposure may bring cardiovascular benefits by reducing blood pressure.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304693
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.379
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.240
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, MF-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CWH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:33:47Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:33:47Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2021, v. 11, p. article no. 3010-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304693-
dc.description.abstractLead is a heavy metal without a biological role. High level of lead exposure is known to be associated with hypertension, but the risk at low levels of exposure is uncertain. In this study, data from US NHANES 1999–2016 were analyzed. Adults with blood lead and blood pressure measurements, or self-reported hypertension diagnosis, were included. If not already diagnosed, hypertension was defined according to the AHA/ACC 2017 hypertension guideline. Results were analyzed using R statistics version 3.5.1 with sample weight adjustment. Logistic regression was used to study the association between blood lead level and hypertension. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated. Altogether, 39,477 participants were included. Every doubling in blood lead level was associated with hypertension (OR [95%CI] 1.45 [1.40–1.50]), which remained significant after adjusting for demographics. Using quartile 1 as reference, higher blood lead levels were associated with increased adjusted odds of hypertension (Quartile 4 vs. Quartile 1: 1.22 [1.09–1.36]; Quartile 3 vs. Quartile 1: 1.15 [1.04–1.28]; Quartile 2 vs. Quartile 1: 1.14 [1.05–1.25]). In conclusion, blood lead level is associated with hypertension in the general population with blood lead levels below 5 µg/dL. Our findings suggest that reducing present levels of environmental lead exposure may bring cardiovascular benefits by reducing blood pressure.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsScientific Reports. Copyright © Nature Research: Fully open access journals.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleBlood lead level and risk of hypertension in the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2016-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, TT=rp01682-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-82435-6-
dc.identifier.pmid33542319-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7862639-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85100474033-
dc.identifier.hkuros326198-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 3010-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 3010-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000618048600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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