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Article: Prenatal Depression, Breastfeeding, and Infant Gut Microbiota

TitlePrenatal Depression, Breastfeeding, and Infant Gut Microbiota
Authors
Keywordsprenatal depression
breastfeeding
birth mode
infant
gut microbiota
Issue Date2021
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/microbiology/
Citation
Frontiers in Microbiology, 2021, v. 12, p. article no. 664257 How to Cite?
AbstractDepressive symptoms are common during pregnancy and are estimated to affect 7–20% of pregnant women, with higher prevalence found in those with a prior history of depression, in ethnic minorities, and those with increased exposure to stressful life events. Maternal depression often remains undiagnosed, and its symptoms can increase adverse health risks to the infant, including impaired cognitive development, behavioral problems, and higher susceptibility to physical illnesses. Accumulating research evidence supports the association between maternal physical health elements to infant gut health, including factors such as mode of delivery, medication, feeding status, and antibiotic use. However, specific maternal prenatal psychosocial factors and their effect on infant gut microbiota and immunity remains an area that is not well understood. This article reviews the literature and supplements it with new findings to show that prenatal depression alters: (i) gut microbial composition in partially and fully formula-fed infants at 3–4 months of age, and (ii) gut immunity (i.e., secretory Immunoglobulin A) in all infants independent of breastfeeding status. Understanding the implications of maternal depression on the infant gut microbiome is important to enhance both maternal and child health and to better inform disease outcomes and management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304887
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.64
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.701
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, N-
dc.contributor.authorTun, HM-
dc.contributor.authorField, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorMandhane, PJ-
dc.contributor.authorScott, JA-
dc.contributor.authorKozyrskyj, AL-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:36:38Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:36:38Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Microbiology, 2021, v. 12, p. article no. 664257-
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304887-
dc.description.abstractDepressive symptoms are common during pregnancy and are estimated to affect 7–20% of pregnant women, with higher prevalence found in those with a prior history of depression, in ethnic minorities, and those with increased exposure to stressful life events. Maternal depression often remains undiagnosed, and its symptoms can increase adverse health risks to the infant, including impaired cognitive development, behavioral problems, and higher susceptibility to physical illnesses. Accumulating research evidence supports the association between maternal physical health elements to infant gut health, including factors such as mode of delivery, medication, feeding status, and antibiotic use. However, specific maternal prenatal psychosocial factors and their effect on infant gut microbiota and immunity remains an area that is not well understood. This article reviews the literature and supplements it with new findings to show that prenatal depression alters: (i) gut microbial composition in partially and fully formula-fed infants at 3–4 months of age, and (ii) gut immunity (i.e., secretory Immunoglobulin A) in all infants independent of breastfeeding status. Understanding the implications of maternal depression on the infant gut microbiome is important to enhance both maternal and child health and to better inform disease outcomes and management.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/microbiology/-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Microbiology-
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectprenatal depression-
dc.subjectbreastfeeding-
dc.subjectbirth mode-
dc.subjectinfant-
dc.subjectgut microbiota-
dc.titlePrenatal Depression, Breastfeeding, and Infant Gut Microbiota-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTun, HM: heinmtun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTun, HM=rp02389-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2021.664257-
dc.identifier.pmid34394021-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8363245-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85112473357-
dc.identifier.hkuros326425-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 664257-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 664257-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000692817700001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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