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Article: Phenotypic and genetic characterization of MERS coronaviruses from Africa to understand their zoonotic potential

TitlePhenotypic and genetic characterization of MERS coronaviruses from Africa to understand their zoonotic potential
Authors
KeywordsMERS-CoV
coronaviruses
Africa
phenotype
characterization
Issue Date2021
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2021, v. 118 n. 25, p. article no. e2103984118 How to Cite?
AbstractCoronaviruses are pathogens of pandemic potential. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. More than 70% of MERS-CoV–infected dromedaries are found in East, North, and West Africa, but zoonotic MERS disease is only reported from the Arabian Peninsula. We compared viral replication competence of clade A and B viruses from the Arabian Peninsula with genetically diverse clade C viruses found in East (Egypt, Kenya, and Ethiopia), North (Morocco), and West (Nigeria and Burkina Faso) Africa. Viruses from Africa had lower replication competence in ex vivo cultures of the human lung and in lungs of experimentally infected human-DPP4 (hDPP4) knockin mice. We used lentivirus pseudotypes expressing MERS-CoV spike from Saudi Arabian clade A prototype strain (EMC) or African clade C1.1 viruses and demonstrated that clade C1.1 spike was associated with reduced virus entry into the respiratory epithelial cell line Calu-3. Isogenic EMC viruses with spike protein from EMC or clade C1.1 generated by reverse genetics showed that the clade C1.1 spike was associated with reduced virus replication competence in Calu-3 cells in vitro, in ex vivo human bronchus, and in lungs of hDPP4 knockin mice in vivo. These findings may explain why zoonotic MERS disease has not been reported from Africa so far, despite exposure to and infection with MERS-CoV.
DescriptionHybrid open access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306101
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 11.205
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.011
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Z-
dc.contributor.authorHui, KPY-
dc.contributor.authorSo, RTY-
dc.contributor.authorLv, H-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorChu, DKW-
dc.contributor.authorGelaye, E-
dc.contributor.authorOyas, H-
dc.contributor.authorNjagi, O-
dc.contributor.authorAbayneh, T-
dc.contributor.authorKuria, W-
dc.contributor.authorWalelign, E-
dc.contributor.authorWanglia, R-
dc.contributor.authorEl Masry, I-
dc.contributor.authorVon Dobschuetz, S-
dc.contributor.authorKalpravidh, W-
dc.contributor.authorChevalier, V-
dc.contributor.authorMiguel, E-
dc.contributor.authorFassi-Fihri, O-
dc.contributor.authorTrarore, A-
dc.contributor.authorLiang, W-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JM-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, MCW-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LML-
dc.contributor.authorMok, CKP-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, M-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-20T10:18:48Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-20T10:18:48Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2021, v. 118 n. 25, p. article no. e2103984118-
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306101-
dc.descriptionHybrid open access-
dc.description.abstractCoronaviruses are pathogens of pandemic potential. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. More than 70% of MERS-CoV–infected dromedaries are found in East, North, and West Africa, but zoonotic MERS disease is only reported from the Arabian Peninsula. We compared viral replication competence of clade A and B viruses from the Arabian Peninsula with genetically diverse clade C viruses found in East (Egypt, Kenya, and Ethiopia), North (Morocco), and West (Nigeria and Burkina Faso) Africa. Viruses from Africa had lower replication competence in ex vivo cultures of the human lung and in lungs of experimentally infected human-DPP4 (hDPP4) knockin mice. We used lentivirus pseudotypes expressing MERS-CoV spike from Saudi Arabian clade A prototype strain (EMC) or African clade C1.1 viruses and demonstrated that clade C1.1 spike was associated with reduced virus entry into the respiratory epithelial cell line Calu-3. Isogenic EMC viruses with spike protein from EMC or clade C1.1 generated by reverse genetics showed that the clade C1.1 spike was associated with reduced virus replication competence in Calu-3 cells in vitro, in ex vivo human bronchus, and in lungs of hDPP4 knockin mice in vivo. These findings may explain why zoonotic MERS disease has not been reported from Africa so far, despite exposure to and infection with MERS-CoV.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences-
dc.rightsProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectMERS-CoV-
dc.subjectcoronaviruses-
dc.subjectAfrica-
dc.subjectphenotype-
dc.subjectcharacterization-
dc.titlePhenotypic and genetic characterization of MERS coronaviruses from Africa to understand their zoonotic potential-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhou, Z: candyzzq@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, KPY: kenrie@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSo, RTY: soty@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, MCW: mchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LML: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, KPY=rp02149-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, DKW=rp02512-
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, MCW=rp00420-
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LML=rp00484-
dc.identifier.authorityMok, CKP=rp01805-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.2103984118-
dc.identifier.pmid34099577-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8237650-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85107889243-
dc.identifier.hkuros327448-
dc.identifier.volume118-
dc.identifier.issue25-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e2103984118-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e2103984118-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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