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Conference Paper: Facial emotion recognition after subcortical cerebrovascular diseases

TitleFacial emotion recognition after subcortical cerebrovascular diseases
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2001
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INS
Citation
The Twenty-Fourth Annual International Neuropsychological Society Mid-Year Conference, Brasilia, Brazil, 5-7 July 2001. Abstract in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2001, v. 7 n. 4, p. 424 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present-study is intended to study the pathological manifestation of subcortical cerebrovascular disease in the aspect of facial emotion recognition. Subcortical structures were believed to be responsible for the recognition of facial expressions. Universal facial expressions of happy, disgust, fear, surprise, sad, and angry were validated and used as the prototype expressions. The study was conducted on 2 patient groups consisting of 19 patients in each group with damages in the left and the right hemisphere due to subcortical cerebrovascular disease. They were asked to recognize the interpolated emotional expressions intended to explore whether they can recognize the emotions and the small changes between different basic emotions. Significant group differences were found between patient groups and control group in accurately responding to the emotion. The major findings presented in this study are consistent with previous studies which showed the impairment of recognition of facial emotions is related to lesion to the subcortical areas. The study provided preliminary evidence to the role of the subcortical region in emotion recognition, including the thalamus and the internal capsule, which were seldom studied in previous researches. Furthermore, the results showed that the right hemisphere has the advantage of emotion recognition over the left hemisphere.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42598
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.576
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.348

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:27:22Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:27:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Twenty-Fourth Annual International Neuropsychological Society Mid-Year Conference, Brasilia, Brazil, 5-7 July 2001. Abstract in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2001, v. 7 n. 4, p. 424en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42598-
dc.description.abstractThe present-study is intended to study the pathological manifestation of subcortical cerebrovascular disease in the aspect of facial emotion recognition. Subcortical structures were believed to be responsible for the recognition of facial expressions. Universal facial expressions of happy, disgust, fear, surprise, sad, and angry were validated and used as the prototype expressions. The study was conducted on 2 patient groups consisting of 19 patients in each group with damages in the left and the right hemisphere due to subcortical cerebrovascular disease. They were asked to recognize the interpolated emotional expressions intended to explore whether they can recognize the emotions and the small changes between different basic emotions. Significant group differences were found between patient groups and control group in accurately responding to the emotion. The major findings presented in this study are consistent with previous studies which showed the impairment of recognition of facial emotions is related to lesion to the subcortical areas. The study provided preliminary evidence to the role of the subcortical region in emotion recognition, including the thalamus and the internal capsule, which were seldom studied in previous researches. Furthermore, the results showed that the right hemisphere has the advantage of emotion recognition over the left hemisphere.-
dc.format.extent24541 bytes-
dc.format.extent26112 bytes-
dc.format.extent71804 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society-
dc.subjectMedical sciencesen_HK
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurologyen_HK
dc.titleFacial emotion recognition after subcortical cerebrovascular diseasesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1355617701744104-
dc.identifier.hkuros63339-

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