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Article: Occlusal Features and Caries Experience of Hong Kong Chinese Preschool Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

TitleOcclusal Features and Caries Experience of Hong Kong Chinese Preschool Children: A Cross-Sectional Study
Authors
KeywordsCaries
Children
Malocclusion
Occlusal features
Primary teeth
Issue Date2017
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2017, v. 14 n. 6, article no. 621 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study occlusal features and their relation to caries experience in Hong Kong Chinese preschool children. Methods: Seven kindergarten classes in Hong Kong were selected using a stratified random sampling method, and the 4- and 5-year-old Chinese kindergarten children were invited to join the survey. Two calibrated dentists performed the clinical examinations in the kindergartens. Occlusion features, including incisal overjet; canine and molar relationship; median diastema; and primate space as well as malocclusion features, including crossbite; anterior open bite; and scissor bite, were recorded. Caries experience was recorded with the dmft index. Results: A total of 538 children were invited to participate in the study, and finally 495 children were examined (92%). Approximately half (52%) had a normal incisor relationship. Most children had a class I canine relationship (left-79%; right-75%). Approximately two-thirds had a flush terminal plane (left-64%; right-65%). Most children (76%) had a maxillary primate space, and 47% had a mandibular primate space. The prevalence of median diastema, anterior crossbite, and unilateral posterior crossbite was 30%, 12% and 1%, respectively. No bilateral posterior crossbite or scissor bite was found. Approximately half (49%) had caries experience. The mean dmft score was 2.1. Gender and age were not associated with either the studied occlusal features or the mean dmft score (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Approximately half of the Hong Kong preschool children studied had a normal occlusion, and two-thirds of them had a flush terminal plane. About three-quarters of them had a maxillary primate space, and half of them had a mandibular primate space. Their occlusal traits were not associated with caries experience and prevalence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241549
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 2.468
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.883
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, S.N.-
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECM-
dc.contributor.authorChu, CH-
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-20T01:45:14Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-20T01:45:14Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2017, v. 14 n. 6, article no. 621-
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/241549-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study occlusal features and their relation to caries experience in Hong Kong Chinese preschool children. Methods: Seven kindergarten classes in Hong Kong were selected using a stratified random sampling method, and the 4- and 5-year-old Chinese kindergarten children were invited to join the survey. Two calibrated dentists performed the clinical examinations in the kindergartens. Occlusion features, including incisal overjet; canine and molar relationship; median diastema; and primate space as well as malocclusion features, including crossbite; anterior open bite; and scissor bite, were recorded. Caries experience was recorded with the dmft index. Results: A total of 538 children were invited to participate in the study, and finally 495 children were examined (92%). Approximately half (52%) had a normal incisor relationship. Most children had a class I canine relationship (left-79%; right-75%). Approximately two-thirds had a flush terminal plane (left-64%; right-65%). Most children (76%) had a maxillary primate space, and 47% had a mandibular primate space. The prevalence of median diastema, anterior crossbite, and unilateral posterior crossbite was 30%, 12% and 1%, respectively. No bilateral posterior crossbite or scissor bite was found. Approximately half (49%) had caries experience. The mean dmft score was 2.1. Gender and age were not associated with either the studied occlusal features or the mean dmft score (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Approximately half of the Hong Kong preschool children studied had a normal occlusion, and two-thirds of them had a flush terminal plane. About three-quarters of them had a maxillary primate space, and half of them had a mandibular primate space. Their occlusal traits were not associated with caries experience and prevalence.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCaries-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectMalocclusion-
dc.subjectOcclusal features-
dc.subjectPrimary teeth-
dc.titleOcclusal Features and Caries Experience of Hong Kong Chinese Preschool Children: A Cross-Sectional Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: edward-lo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, CH: chchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CH=rp00022-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph14060621-
dc.identifier.pmid28598387-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5486307-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85020376120-
dc.identifier.hkuros272749-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 621-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 621-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000404107600069-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.identifier.issnl1660-4601-

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