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Article: Effect of Frequency of Carbohydrate Feedings on Recovery and Subsequent Endurance Run

TitleEffect of Frequency of Carbohydrate Feedings on Recovery and Subsequent Endurance Run
Authors
KeywordsEndurance running
Feeding patterns
Glycemic index
Metabolism
Issue Date2004
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org
Citation
Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise, 2004, v. 36 n. 2, p. 315-323 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study examined the effect of feeding pattern of a high glycemic index (GI) meal during a short-term recovery on subsequent endurance capacity. Methods: Eight men ran at 70% VO2max on a level treadmill for 90 min (T1) on two occasions, followed by 4-h recovery (R) and a further exhaustive run at the same speed (T2). During the R, subjects consumed a prescribed meal with a GI of 77 in either a "gorging" (GOR) or "nibbling" (NIB) intake pattern, providing 1.5 g carbohydrate (CHO) per kilogram body mass. In the GOR trial, the foods were consumed in a single bolus. 20 min after the end of T1. In the NIB trial, the same quantity of food was ingested in three equal portions; the first consumed 20 min after the end of T1 and the remainder at hourly intervals thereafter. Results: The run time during T2 was similar between trials (GOR vs NIB: 68.1 ± 8.2 vs 66.8 ± 8.7 min, P > 0.05). However, CHO utilization was lower and fat utilization higher during T2 in the GOR trial compared with the NIB trial (GOR vs NIB: CHO: 94.4 ± 11.4 vs 117.6 ± 10.6 g, P < 0.05; FAT: 55. 9 ± 8.0 vs 44 ± 8.6 g, P < 0.01). Conclusions: These results suggest that serial consumption of a high GI meal during a 4-h recovery increased the reliance on CHO oxidation for energy provision during a subsequent run when compared with a single feeding. However, there was no difference in the duration of the exhaustive run after the recovery between the GOR and NIB trials.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148372
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.411
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.703
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiu, PMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, SHSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, JGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, PKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:12:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:12:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedicine And Science In Sports And Exercise, 2004, v. 36 n. 2, p. 315-323en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148372-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined the effect of feeding pattern of a high glycemic index (GI) meal during a short-term recovery on subsequent endurance capacity. Methods: Eight men ran at 70% VO2max on a level treadmill for 90 min (T1) on two occasions, followed by 4-h recovery (R) and a further exhaustive run at the same speed (T2). During the R, subjects consumed a prescribed meal with a GI of 77 in either a "gorging" (GOR) or "nibbling" (NIB) intake pattern, providing 1.5 g carbohydrate (CHO) per kilogram body mass. In the GOR trial, the foods were consumed in a single bolus. 20 min after the end of T1. In the NIB trial, the same quantity of food was ingested in three equal portions; the first consumed 20 min after the end of T1 and the remainder at hourly intervals thereafter. Results: The run time during T2 was similar between trials (GOR vs NIB: 68.1 ± 8.2 vs 66.8 ± 8.7 min, P > 0.05). However, CHO utilization was lower and fat utilization higher during T2 in the GOR trial compared with the NIB trial (GOR vs NIB: CHO: 94.4 ± 11.4 vs 117.6 ± 10.6 g, P < 0.05; FAT: 55. 9 ± 8.0 vs 44 ± 8.6 g, P < 0.01). Conclusions: These results suggest that serial consumption of a high GI meal during a 4-h recovery increased the reliance on CHO oxidation for energy provision during a subsequent run when compared with a single feeding. However, there was no difference in the duration of the exhaustive run after the recovery between the GOR and NIB trials.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and Science in Sports and Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectEndurance running-
dc.subjectFeeding patterns-
dc.subjectGlycemic index-
dc.subjectMetabolism-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates - Administration & Dosage - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intake - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavior - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Endurance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPostprandial Period - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPotassium - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshRecovery Of Function - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRunning - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSodium - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshWater-Electrolyte Balance - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleEffect of Frequency of Carbohydrate Feedings on Recovery and Subsequent Endurance Runen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CW:ching-wanlam@pathology.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CW=rp00260en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/01.MSS.0000113475.51491.78en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14767257-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0842324932en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0842324932&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage315en_US
dc.identifier.epage323en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188800600022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.issnl0195-9131-

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