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Article: Relationship between neurocognitive function and clinical symptoms with self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders

TitleRelationship between neurocognitive function and clinical symptoms with self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders
Authors
Keywordscognition
schizophrenia-spectrum disorder
self-stigma
Issue Date2019
Citation
Journal of Mental Health, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. 583-588 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Self-stigma is associated with poor outcomes of patients with schizophrenia and development of self-stigma is a complex process. Results of studies on relationship of both positive and negative symptoms of psychosis with self-stigma have been inconsistent. Cognitive deficits are common to patients. However, number of studies exploring the relationship specifically between self-stigma and neurocognition are limited. Aims: The current study aimed to examine the relationship between neurocognitive functions and clinical symptoms with self-stigma. Methods: Sixty-four patients with psychosis were recruited and completed the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and neurocognitive tests. Their clinical symptoms and role functioning were also assessed. Results: Neurocognitive function was found to have negative correlations with Stereotype Endorsement and Discrimination Experience. Negative symptoms also correlated negatively with Stereotype Endorsement, Discrimination Experience, and Social Withdrawal. Neurocognitive function and negative symptoms explained 21.2% variance of stereotype endorsement. Neurocognitive function explained 7.9% variance of Discrimination Experience. Conclusions: Poor neurocognitive function is related to self-stigma. This study also further confirmed the relationship between negative symptoms and self-stigma. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted to confirm the nature of such a relationship.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242266
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.771
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KW-
dc.contributor.authorKao, SYS-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SL-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-24T01:37:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-24T01:37:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Mental Health, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. 583-588-
dc.identifier.issn0963-8237-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242266-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Self-stigma is associated with poor outcomes of patients with schizophrenia and development of self-stigma is a complex process. Results of studies on relationship of both positive and negative symptoms of psychosis with self-stigma have been inconsistent. Cognitive deficits are common to patients. However, number of studies exploring the relationship specifically between self-stigma and neurocognition are limited. Aims: The current study aimed to examine the relationship between neurocognitive functions and clinical symptoms with self-stigma. Methods: Sixty-four patients with psychosis were recruited and completed the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and neurocognitive tests. Their clinical symptoms and role functioning were also assessed. Results: Neurocognitive function was found to have negative correlations with Stereotype Endorsement and Discrimination Experience. Negative symptoms also correlated negatively with Stereotype Endorsement, Discrimination Experience, and Social Withdrawal. Neurocognitive function and negative symptoms explained 21.2% variance of stereotype endorsement. Neurocognitive function explained 7.9% variance of Discrimination Experience. Conclusions: Poor neurocognitive function is related to self-stigma. This study also further confirmed the relationship between negative symptoms and self-stigma. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted to confirm the nature of such a relationship.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Mental Health-
dc.subjectcognition-
dc.subjectschizophrenia-spectrum disorder-
dc.subjectself-stigma-
dc.titleRelationship between neurocognitive function and clinical symptoms with self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKao, SYS: ssykao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09638237.2017.1340599-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85021216592-
dc.identifier.hkuros273279-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage583-
dc.identifier.epage588-
dc.identifier.eissn1360-0567-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000499934600002-
dc.identifier.issnl0963-8237-

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